Large cities may cut emissions by a third based on improvements in housing density alone. Reducing driving is essential

Patrick Sisson at Curbed pointed out recently that some studies have estimated that large global cities could cut their emissions by a third based on improvements in housing density alone. We have to start talking about these solutions and making them part of mainstream environmental policy, Hankins says. Time is running out. “We can’t afford to ignore significant climate mitigation measures just …

Car bans are the future in vehicle clogged cities

“It might feel odd to stroll across a crosswalk and not have the grill of a car, waiting to turn right, breathing on your leg. Vehicles have taken over our streets, so people assume vehicles have the right of way,” said Kaufman. Car bans aren’t just about getting places faster. Urban dwellers don’t have to tolerate car-choked streets where pedestrian …

Janette Sadik-Khan: Car Crashes Are an Epidemic We Can Solve

“Government and public health officials routinely face problems that exceed their capacities and powers. Traffic deaths are not one of them. Although the average transportation agency confines itself to repairing potholes, repaving roads, maintaining signs, and so on, there is much more that municipal governments can do. From 2007 to 2013, both of us worked in the New York City …

LEED Platinum City Denver and Paris’ transformation to a city where needs met within a 15-minute bike ride or 20 minute walk

Denver and Paris are leading cities in a climate and sustainability transformation. Paris needs to become a “15-minute city.” That’s the message from the manifesto of Mayor Anne Hidalgo, who is seeking re-election this March. Hidalgo has been leading a radical overhaul of the city’s mobility culture since taking office in 2014, and has already barred the most polluting vehicles from entry, …

How to end traffic (over 2.5 million wasted hours annually in the US): European cities offer a roadmap for life with fewer cars

And motor vehicles remain the leading cause of death in the United States, killing over 35,000 people every year (along with the eight people hospitalized and 99 people treated and released for every one person who dies). By James Nevius, Curbed,  Jan 29, 2020 AmericansAmericans put over 13,000 miles on their vehicles every year. If car commercials are to be believed, this is all done off-roading into the woods …

‘The streets are more alive’: Ghent readers on a car-free city centre

We asked locals in the Belgian city to tell us how things have changed since the shake-up Guardian readers and Rachel Obordom The Guardian, Mon 20 Jan 2020 ‘Teaching my son to cycle has been a fun and relatively stress-free experience’ The city has become a pedestrians and cyclists’ joy, especially for people like me who live in the city centre and …

Car-free zones could be the future of cities + the story of two city transit upgrades

San Francisco and New York City are limiting cars on certain streets to prioritize other modes of transit.By Terry Nguyenterry. nguyen@voxmedia.com  Oct 28, 2019, 8:30am EDT In her 1961 book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urbanist writer Jane Jacobs posed a prescient concern. She forecasted one of two possible outcomes for our urban future: “erosion of cities by automobiles, or attrition …

Fall 2019 Bike and Ped Resources from FHWA

FHWA Releases Bicycle and Pedestrian University Course The Federal Highway Administration recently published a Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation University Course. The course is designed to support educators in civil engineering, urban planning, and related fields to help students become familiar with basic policies, practices, tools, and design principles to create bicycle and pedestrian-friendly communities. The course materials incorporate the latest resources, best …

Denver’s 2020 budget will fund just five miles of new sidewalks out of more than 2,000 miles that are missing or sub-standard

Streetsblog Denver, Sept 2019 The Denver Streets Partnership told members of the council that mobility funding within Hancock’s $1.49 billion proposed budget is so paltry that it would take 400 years to build out a complete sidewalk network.  “Mayor Hancock’s proposed 2020 budget will fund just five miles of new sidewalks out of more than 2,000 miles that are missing …