Regenerative Agriculture: Good for Soil Health, but Limited Potential to Mitigate Climate Change

Much of the recent limelight for agricultural emissions reductions shines on one option that our report found had limited potential: increasing carbon sequestration in soils through practices broadly referred to as “regenerative agriculture.” …if the world fails to reduce emissions in other sectors like energy and transport, we’ll need to rely ever more heavily on land solutions, exacerbating food and …

Trees cool air, slow runoff, and boost students and public health. Should trees be seen as a public utility which all must be able to access?

Benefits of trees include slowing stormwater runoff, cooling air temperatures, and even boosting student achievement and public health. Trees capture more than a third of rainfall, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), easing the strain on flooding and stormwater infrastructure. Their shade helps lower energy use by nearly half, according to the EPA, while reducing carbon emissions by …

Rainforest being cut down at the rate of 1 acre per second, and response

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/10/14/the-musks-embrace-the-challenge-of-climate-change/ – excerpt below The rainforest was being cut down at the rate of 1 acre per second. That really hit me. Every second going by was another acre of rainforest lost! The complex ecology of a rainforest is too much for this short article, but it would take 150 to 200 years for a rainforest to regenerate if it …

Grasslands More Reliable Carbon Sink Than Trees

Tree initiative in Denver – further down. In Wildfire-Prone California, Grasslands a Less Vulnerable Carbon Offset Than Forests. Increased drought and wildfire risk make grasslands more reliable carbon sinks than trees Grasslands should be given opportunities in state’s cap-and-trade market as long-term investment By Kat Kerlin | Jul 9, 2018 Forests have long served as a critical carbon sink, consuming about a quarter of …

11 facts about coast redwoods, the tallest trees in the world

Melissa Breyer August 29, 2017 Sturdy, stalwart, and superlatively statuesque, California’s coast redwoods stand out as some of the most impressive organisms on the planet. Before the 1850s, coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) luxuriated amongst some 2 million acres of California’s coast, stretching from south of Big Sur to just over the Oregon border. One of three members of the Sequoioideae …

Is the Amazon vulnerable to a ‘dieback’?

Indigenous people say the rainfall has changed. And “the models, and they’re pretty consistent. They suggest that the combination of fire and climate change and deforestation will weaken the hydrological cycle of the Amazon to the point where you just get insufficient rainfall in the south and the east, and then part of the central Amazon, to actually support a …

Do Plants Have Something to Say?

One scientist is definitely listening. Monica Gagliano, all ears in Central Park.CreditCreditGeorge Etheredge for The New York Times By Ellie Shechet, Aug. 26, 2019 Monica Gagliano says that she has received Yoda-like advice from trees and shrubbery. She recalls being rocked like a baby by the spirit of a fern. She has ridden on the back of an invisible bear conjured by an osha root. …

Rising water stress will affect plants: if the water potential and vapor pressure are larger in the atmosphere – water will dissipate faster and stronger from soil and plants

The increased growth rate of plants seen worldwide in response to rising CO2 levels – a phenomenon known as “global greening” – could be stalled by growing water stress, a study finds. Global warming is driving changes to water vapour levels, the research finds, which could, in turn, be affecting the rate of plant photosynthesis – the process underpinning plant growth. Article …

The Wisdom of Trees: Walt Whitman on What Our Silent Friends Teach Us About Being Rather Than Seeming

A supreme lesson in authenticity from a being “so innocent and harmless, yet so savage.” BY MARIA POPOVA “When we have learned how to listen to trees,” Hermann Hesse wrote in his lyrical love letter to our arboreal companions, “then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy.” Two generations earlier, a different titan of poetic …