Car culture disproportionately kills Black Americans. The number of Black people who died in traffic collisions rose by nearly a quarter last year

Adam Mahoney, Environmental Justice Fellow, Grist, Jul 07, 2021, Climate + Transportation Huey Randle Jr. lived down the street from my grandmother for 47 years. The 66-year-old Black Vietnam War veteran was a staple in his community, regularly seen out and about on daily walks. For his daughter Chiquita, he was a rock, always willing to help her when needed, …

Rights and claims for mobility in metropolitan areas

Metropolis Issue Paper on “Rights and claims for metropolitan mobility” “By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons” The analysis of the satisfaction of mobility needs enables …

Making Open Science the new normal for transport research

June 9 2021 Making Open Science the new normal for transport researchBE OPEN project Final Event The final event of BE OPEN project was held online on June 9th, 2021 from 13:00 to 16:00 CET (Central European Time), shedding light on the topic of “Making Open Science the new normal for transport research”. The programme and presentations are available to download below. The recording of the event is available …

Leading health damages from vehicle pollution in 12 states and Washington, DC: Ammonia emissions alone cause 10% of early deaths. The largest health damages were $4 million for every ton of particulate matter emitted. Ozone and fine particulate matter from vehicle emissions in 2016 led to an estimated 7,100 deaths in the NE and Mid-Atlantic regions of the US.

A new study that quantifies the total and interstate deaths from transportation-related air pollution from five vehicle types in 12 states and Washington, D.C. has been published in Environmental Research Letters. The research was led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard T.H Chan School …

Some of the worst ozone pollution in the U.S. settles along the Front Range

Colorado has made some progress toward reducing the chemical dangerous to human health. But it will take leaning on automobiles and oil and gas producers to really move the needle. Mark Jaffe, Jun 7, 2021, Colorado Sun When it comes to oxygen, the Front Range sometimes has too much of a good thing. On many sunny, summer days the region …

Is Free Public Transit an Idea Whose Time Has Come?

By SANDY SMITH, Next City, MAY 19, 2021 New York City’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is one of several large public-transit agencies contemplating a fare-free future. (Photo by Adjoajo/CC BY-SA 4.0) The debate over transportation equity has heated up, given the sharp change in transit-rider demographics once the COVID-19 pandemic took most whiter and wealthier riders off of buses and (especially) …

People frequently visit locations that are geographically closer to them: the number of visitors to any location decreases as the inverse square of the product of their visiting frequency and travel distance

Millions of People’s Location Data Revealed a ‘Universal’ Pattern In Study, Joint MIT Senseable City Laboratory and Santa Fe Institute Study analyzed cell phone data and found what the researchers describe as a new “universal visitation law of human mobility” that “opens up unprecedented possibilities” to predict flows between locations and that can be applied to cities as diverse as …