Early microtransit trials have shown it’s better to build on existing services than try to create entirely new systems

By Patrick Sisson  Jan 9, 2018, StreetsBlog  KCATA Wrapped Ford Transit Van photographed Feb. 10, 2016 in front of Kansas City’s Union Station. Bridj In the age of Uber and Lyft, many planners and pundits believe the answer to mass transit’s shrinking ridership and service issues must be better technology. But a new study of municipal microtransit—small-scale, on-demand public transit services—suggests the real issue …

Transit successes: Toronto Cleared Cars Off Its Biggest Transit Street, and Ridership Soared Almost Overnight

By Angie Schmitt, Streetsblog, Jan 12, 2018 article 5 Using low-cost materials like this concrete divider, Toronto set up new streetcar stops on the far side of intersections on King Street, enabling safer boarding and cutting down on time stopped at red lights. Photo: Human Transit It’s been just a few short months since Toronto cleared most of the car traffic off King Street, giving the …

100% electric buses, 100% EV taxis are next — Chinese City’s Record-Smashing 16,359 Electric Bus Fleet

January 3rd, 2018 by Tim Dixon on Clean Technica  Electric buses are a fun topic. They offer smoother, quieter, cleaner transport that leaves passengers, drivers, and everyone nearby feeling better. We get excited about electric bus orders that for 4 buses, and we get really excited about orders for a couple of dozen electric buses. Hundreds? Come on, don’t be crazy! But enter …

Data, visioning, inclusivity, and infrastructure expansion trends

3 Jan 2018, 6 trends that will define smart cities in 2018 by Katie Pyzyk in Smart Cities Dive A new year tends to be a time for renewal in many aspects, with a particular focus on improvement. Whether resolutions involve kicking old habits or beginning a new activity, the changes usually all come back to advancement. The same holds true in the …

Rail riders more likely to be employed, have cars, and care about parking costs. Bus riders more likely to be transit-dependent.

By Angela Urban – March 31, 2017 on Mobility Lab 1 Inspiring transit ridership requires meeting people where they are.  How to find and engage riders: if connecting with existing transit riders is the goal, one can target rail riders, more employed than bus riders, through employers. Communicating with bus riders, who ride for more need-based reasons, could happen in community centers, doctor’s offices, or …

Cities will need to fight zero-occupant miles with “TDM for autonomous vehicles”

By Howard Jennings – May 30, 2017 Mobility Lab 7 The advent of autonomous vehicles is fraught with uncertainty, especially when it comes to their impacts on traffic, travel choices, and the broader transportation system.They offer many potential benefits, but many potential negative impacts, depending in part on how they are deployed. While widespread adoption may still be decades away, significant numbers will begin to …

INRIX shines big data on Transit Leap

By John Niles, End of Driving, 2017-03-23  In our book chapter, Transit Leap: A Deployment path for shared-use autonomous vehicles that supports sustainability (Springer, 2017), we described a way for regional and municipal governments to start deploying local area, autonomous transit. We described seeking out small areas in which demand would be constrained to short trips that could be safely provided in driverless, …

Regional transportation plans are stuck in the headlights of autonomous vehicles

By John Niles, End of Driving, 2017-09-15  |    Leave a comment On Sep. 14th, Metrolinx, focusing on the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Region (GTHA), released its draft Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). I highlighted selected passages relevant to thinking about autonomous vehicles. I am concerned about a mismatch in the draft between current and expected demand, expected disruption from automation, and the projection of …

Tech may be the cure for collisions between buses and people biking and walking

By Kelley Coyner – October 3, 2017 – A Mobility Lab top article from 2017 Uri Tamir of Intel’s Mobileye and Mobility Momma last discussed how vehicle cameras can now eliminate blind spots, warn drivers about bikers and walkers, and map bike and pedestrian hot spots.While the brains of automated vehicles may not be able to predict cyclist behavior, Tamir said that Mobileye’s Shield+ technology can still help …