Links to how bike-friendly slow streets are changing cities

How bike-friendly ‘slow streets’ are changing cities, BBC, Nov 19, 2020 by Mark Johanson Moving around Bogotá can be a bit of a Jekyll-or-Hyde experience. On one hand, the city is infamous for having the world’s worst traffic. Yet, on the other, its cycling infrastructure is considered an exemplary model of sustainable urban mobility, according to the Copenhagenize Index, which ranks bike-friendly …

Increasing speed from 25 to 40 mph, note the authors, causes a drop in safety rating from 4.4 to just 2.5. This corresponds with more than a doubling in both crash rates and risk of death

Posted on September 15, 2020, By Chris McCahill, SSTI, Crash prediction tools target high-speed roadways The United States Road Assessment Program (usRAP) offers a tool that transportation agencies can use to evaluate road safety without detailed existing crash data. A recent study in the Transportation Research Record validates the tool using crash data in Utah and highlights vehicle speed as a key factor in the …

Why Your City Doesn’t Map Its Worst Car Crashes: The idea of a “High Injury Network” isn’t new. But a surprising number of cities don’t bother to map it

By Kea Wilson, StreetsBlog, Sep 29, 2020 Time for a pop quiz! (Don’t worry, it’s open book: feel free to hop on Google.) What are the 10 most dangerous intersections or corridors for pedestrians in your city, and what percentage of total crashes occur in these areas? If you don’t know the answer, and can’t easily can’t find it using the …

Want to Stop Car Crashes? Study the Near-Misses

A pilot program in Bellevue, Wash. is using anonymized video and big data to stop crashes before they happen By Kea Wilson Jul 15, 2020, on Streetsblog For once, something intuitive turns out to be true: near-miss car crashes are a very good predictor of actual crashes on that same roadway — and cities can save lives by changing road designs in high-conflict …

New Study Shows That SUVs Remain ‘Disproportionately Likely To Kill’

By Lloyd AlterUpdated July 16, 2020 Ford has just proudly introduced a new, updated version of the Bronco, the company’s Jeep-like off-road capable SUV that was killed in the late 90s. It might seem like an odd time, in the middle of a climate crisis; as Aaron Gordon notes in Vice, “every driver who ‘upgrades’ from a sedan to an SUV is …

Slow streets are the path to a better city: “overnight, transformed our family life and the lives of our neighbors”

Overnight, slow streets transformed our neighborhood. Everyone should have access to the same opportunity. By Courtney E. Martin in Curbed, May 19, 2020 The first time you watch your kid pedal away from you on two wheels, your hand free from her seat, her wobble small and her confidence grand, is one of those high moments that make all the low moments of parenting …

The US didn’t sign a global road safety pact. Now advocates are fighting back

A recent road safety conference in Stockholm seemingly lacked representation from the U.S. federal government. Young advocates were left wondering who is taking charge in eliminating road deaths. Chris Teale@chris_teale, March 24, 2020, Smart Cities Dive  POST The United States turned heads last month with its rejection of a global pledge to eliminate road deaths by 2050. Of 140 countries in attendance …

How reducing inequality will make our cities safer

2 Mar 2020, WEForum by Robert Muggah Principal, SecDev Group and Sameh WahbaGlobal Director, Urban, Disaster Risk Management, Resilience and Land Global Practice, World Bank Overlapping forms of inequality contribute to violent victimization in cities, from wealth inequality to educational opportunities and property rights; In virtually every city, the vast majority of violent crime is concentrated in just a few neighbourhoods; To …

Concerns Grow Over Implementation of State’s New Climate Rules. Also, can we cut back on vehicle use and pollution?

A poll released on February 20 by Colorado College’s State of the Rockies Project found that 70 percent of Colorado voters see climate change as a “serious problem,” up from 63 percent in 2016. Similar percentages of respondents told pollsters that they’re concerned about the environmental impacts of oil and gas development and support a transition to 100 percent clean energy. hin …

Modeling car-free living and development: If you want to live in this new Arizona neighborhood, you can’t own a car + 10 simple policies to subtract cars from our streets

Germany doesn’t have a single goal to improve the pedestrian experience on its streets — it has seven. That’s right: Germany not only has a comprehensive National Walking Plan — something American street-safety advocates only dream of — but its transportation leaders are holding themselves accountable to seven distinct benchmarks for measuring how their policies affect the safety and comfort of people on …