Driver killings of those walking have doubled. Police are failing to report 30-40 percent of 911 calls about drivers striking pedestrians, bicyclists, and other road users, with crashes going unreported most often in Black and brown neighborhoods

In 2004, pedestrians were only 10% of all traffic-related deaths; in 2019, they were 20%. The idea that “distracted walkers” are a major cause of crashes is a myth. State and federal attention focuses almost entirely on protecting people inside vehicles. This is because federal and state DOTs have traditionally focused on highways July 21, 2021 – Last week, Citylab broke an explosive Washington, D.C., study that showed …

Car culture disproportionately kills Black Americans. The number of Black people who died in traffic collisions rose by nearly a quarter last year

Adam Mahoney, Environmental Justice Fellow, Grist, Jul 07, 2021, Climate + Transportation Huey Randle Jr. lived down the street from my grandmother for 47 years. The 66-year-old Black Vietnam War veteran was a staple in his community, regularly seen out and about on daily walks. For his daughter Chiquita, he was a rock, always willing to help her when needed, …

Is Free Public Transit an Idea Whose Time Has Come?

By SANDY SMITH, Next City, MAY 19, 2021 New York City’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is one of several large public-transit agencies contemplating a fare-free future. (Photo by Adjoajo/CC BY-SA 4.0) The debate over transportation equity has heated up, given the sharp change in transit-rider demographics once the COVID-19 pandemic took most whiter and wealthier riders off of buses and (especially) …

How To Design Life-Saving, Low-Speed Zones

By Nikita Luke and Siba El-Samra, May 24, 2021 This piece originally appeared on City Fix. https://usa.streetsblog.org/2021/05/24/how-to-design-life-saving-low-speed-zones/ As the COVID-19 pandemic has altered urban landscapes and pushed many people toward active mobility, there’s increased urgency to make roads safer for walking and cycling. Many cities are now tasked with protecting more vulnerable users in addition to creating safe public spaces that will enable economic …

Safety, less parking, cost-benefit of transport investments

Since 1956 we’ve spent $10 trillion on highways in the United States. For that astronomical sum we have 2.9 million deaths; streets, roads, and bridges that are commonly described as “crumbling;” epic and ever-growing highway congestion; and the single largest sectoral contributor of climate pollution. Now we have ample evidence that this approach is both ineffective and costly. We also …

Safety stop for bikes

making the Safety Stop legal statewide. We enjoyed the conversation and are always excited to have such engaging dialogue about our policy initiatives.  As promised, we wanted to follow up with you all with some resources and recordings.  Here is the recording from last night’s conversation. Please forgive me: I forgot to hit record until we were a couple minutes into …

People take better care of public places when they feel like they have a stake in them. Most “pedestrian” infrastructure projects are remedial and performative; their real purpose is to serve faster car traffic.

January 27, 2021, Suzanne Shu, John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing, Cornell University Takeaways People can feel “psychological ownership,” a sense of personal attachment, even for parks and other public places. These feelings lead them to see property they don’t own as being more valuable and boost their sense of responsibility to take care of it. A recent series of …

What Would Providing Every City with High-Quality, Zero-Emissions Public Transportation Look Like? Also first USDOT Ped Safety Plan

A major investment in transit would be pricey but would drastically improve access and quality. Improving transit quality in every urban area to, at minimum, conditions in the Dallas region would cost an additional $2.2 billion annually. This would be a 4.5 percent increase nationally in operating budgets but would expand per capita transit service by 30.3 percent for the …

US Court of Appeals has found the program Edward Snowden blew the whistle on was unlawful – and that the U.S. intelligence leaders who publicly defended it were not telling the truth

Reuters, Sept 2 2020, U.S. court: Mass surveillance program exposed by Snowden was illegal, by  Raphael Satter (Reuters) – Seven years after former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the mass surveillance of Americans’ telephone records, an appeals court has found the program was unlawful – and that the U.S. intelligence leaders who publicly defended it …

How bike-friendly slow streets are changing cities

How bike-friendly ‘slow streets’ are changing cities, BBC, Nov 19, 2020 by Mark Johanson Moving around Bogotá can be a bit of a Jekyll-or-Hyde experience. On one hand, the city is infamous for having the world’s worst traffic. Yet, on the other, its cycling infrastructure is considered an exemplary model of sustainable urban mobility, according to the Copenhagenize Index, which ranks bike-friendly …