With current emissions heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That’s more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming. The research is …

Last summer’s 600 billion tons of ice loss in Greenland raised global sea levels by nearly a 10th of an inch — or 2.2 millimeters — in two months

The Hill, March 2020. Greenland lost 600 billion tons of ice last summer due to an exceptionally warm season, according to a study released Wednesday.  The study was published Wednesday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.  The data was drawn from satellites designed to measure changes to the earth’s gravitational pull that result from changes in mass, including water.  Last summer’s …

2019 Colorado Hot Issues in Health Conference, Climate Session

Hosted by the nonpartisan Colorado Health Institute, the event has convened the state’s leading thinkers to discuss pressing issues related to health and health care for nearly 20 years. The 2019 Hot Issues in Health Conference will take place on Thursday, December 5, 2019 and Friday, December 6, 2019 at the Hilton Denver Inverness in Englewood, Colorado Moderator: Karam Ahmad, …

Global heating and pollution is already impacting the lungs and health of the world’s children and will shape the future of an entire generation

By Irene Banos Ruiz Pediatricians in New Delhi, India, say children’s lungs are no longer pink, but black. Our warming planet is already impacting the health of the world’s children and will shape the future of an entire generation if we fail to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius (35.6°F), the 2019 Lancet Countdown Report on health and climate change shows. “Over …

Will LA Metro Be Ready To Take The Heat Of Climate Change? It’s ‘Complicated’

“Extreme heat is the most pervasive risk that Metro faces,” according to agency officials, who’ve outlined several hazards extreme heat could pose to the transit system, Metro employees and riders. As global temperatures rise, Southern Californians will be faced with new realities to complicate our postcard-perfect weather. Summerlong heat waves could become the new normal throughout the region, according to scientists — and the …

As Rising Heat Bakes U.S. Cities, The Poor Often Feel It Most

By MEG ANDERSON & SEAN MCMINN, ShareTweetEmail Baltimore’s Franklin Square neighborhood is hotter than about two-thirds of the neighborhoods in the city. It’s also in one of Baltimore’s poorest areas. IAN MORTON FOR NPR Originally published on September 3, 2019 10:31 am When Shakira Franklin drives from West Baltimore to her job near the city’s Inner Harbor, she can feel the summer heat …

Killer Heat in the United States: Climate Choices and the Future of Dangerously Hot Days (2019)

Extreme heat is poised to rise steeply in frequency and severity over the coming decades, bringing unprecedented health risks for people and communities across the country. DOWNLOAD, Full report, Environmental Research Communications research article, Información disponible en español Explore interactive maps of the analysis  County-specific results are available for each of the 3,109 counties in the contiguous United States for …

The air conditioning trap

Excerpt from The Guardian, Aug 29, 2019 by Stephen Buranyi air conditioners are almost uniquely power-hungry appliances: a small unit cooling a single room, on average, consumes more power than running four fridges, while a central unit cooling an average house uses more power than 15. “Last year in Beijing, during a heatwave, 50% of the power capacity was going …

‘Once it starts getting very hot at night, people without air conditioning are going to be at serious risk if they can’t cool down properly.’

How US cities are scrambling to protect people from extreme heat Sweltering citiesCities With cities facing both rapid growth and radical, permanent climate change, urban authorities are faced with an increasingly vulnerable populationCities is supported byAbout this content Oliver Milman in New York, Emily Holden in Washington DC, Tom Dart in Houston Tue 20 Aug 2019 On a sweltering summer day in Washington, DC, Judy …

Cooling goo sidewalks and other strange new weapons in the war on urban heat

“Originally, we thought this was about reducing air conditioning usage and the associated carbon emissions. But it’s really becoming more about public health,” said Spotts. Sweltering cities: Los Angeles faces a doubling of its extreme heat days but has fresh ideas to keep residents cool – and tackle the inequality of who suffers Susie Cagle in Los Angeles, Aug 21, 2019 …