Peak fossil fuel demand and peak ICE vehicles. The recent 3 percent fall in oil demand has led to a 50 percent fall in the oil price. Governments role is to prevent fossil resurgence and to implement a tax wedge

Horse demand famously peaked when cars were just 3 percent of their number, and gas lighting demand peaked when electric lighting was just 2 percent of supply. The consequence of peaking demand for fossil fuels has been playing out for a number of years now, in sector after sector. Peak demand for coal meant lower prices for US coal and …

State climate change action, regulation of HFCs

Feb 2020 R.I. to regulate HFC greenhouse gases Providence Business News Rhode Island is preparing to regulate hydrofluorocarbons, a greenhouse gas common in commercial refrigeration, stationary and mobile air conditioning, heat pumps, foams and aerosols, the R.I. Department of Environmental Management announced on Tuesday. The action will be done along with similar regulations in Massachusetts and Maine, the DEM said. …

What U.S. Farming Can Do to Stop Climate Change: livestock and livestock feed portions of our agricultural lands adds up to 781 million acres, 41 percent of all the land in the Lower 48

Montesino cherry tomatoes grow in a greenhouse at Freedom Food Farm in Raynham, Massachusetts on June 13, 2019. Freedom Food Farm uses compost to add carbon to the soil.PHOTO BY LANE TURNER/THE BOSTON GLOBE/GETTY IMAGESEXCERPTThe landscape of farmland, pastures, ranges, and forest could sequester carbon on a massive scale by 2030. Here’s the math. BY RONNIE CUMMINS  Yes Magazine, FEB 20, 2020 The …

Large cities may cut emissions by a third based on improvements in housing density alone. Reducing driving is essential

Patrick Sisson at Curbed pointed out recently that some studies have estimated that large global cities could cut their emissions by a third based on improvements in housing density alone. We have to start talking about these solutions and making them part of mainstream environmental policy, Hankins says. Time is running out. “We can’t afford to ignore significant climate mitigation measures just …

Personal car use to decline 10% by 2030: study

Kristin Musulin@kristinmusulin Feb. 13, 2020 Private car travel will decline in the world’s largest cities by 10% over the next decade, according to a study from research consultancy firm Kantar, revealed this week at the UN-Habitat World Urban Forum. The firm surveyed 20,000 city dwellers across 31 cities to understand how their preferred mobility modes may change over the next 10 years. …

Montana Gov-appointed Council Makes Recommendations for State to Address Climate Change

By Associated Press, Feb. 11, 2020 HELENA, MONT. (AP) — A council appointed by Montana Gov. Steve Bullock has released a list of draft recommendations for the state to address climate change, reduce greenhouse gases and take advantage of new technology and innovations that will come from the effort. The public has until March 31 to comment on the proposals announced Tuesday by the …

Our Climate as an Infrastructure Asset

January 16, 2020  |  By RMI Oriana Tannenbaum and Rushad Nanavatty Our climate is getting plenty of attention, but we don’t often view it as infrastructure. We should. The global climate comprises an essential and massive part of the natural systems that form the foundation for our world and our society. Our economy is built on assumptions about climate stability. Our real …

Climate change is forcing one person from their home every two seconds, Oxfam

Dec. 10, 2019, Climate Solutions Solar energy innovations on land, on water, and…underground?  Floating solar panels may be the next big thing in renewable power In East Asia, floating solar arrays are already popular as a way to meet countries’ ambitious solar targets in places where land is limited. In the U.S., the National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates there are …

Cement’s CO2 Emissions Are Solved Technically, But Not Economically

November 26th, 2019 by Michael Barnard  Cement is the gray glue that binds our cities and industries together. It makes tall buildings possible and foundations strong. It helps us bridge rivers and valleys and keeps wind turbines upright. We don’t have a replacement for it. It’s not going anywhere. Image: Zach Shahan | CleanTechnica.com But it’s also one of the largest sources of …