Leading for Well-being: it’s time to become leaders ourselves! To dream (and organize) bigger: to address climate change and inequality on a deeper, structural level

By L. Hunter Lovins, Spring 2017.  It’s time to become leaders ourselves, to dream (and organize) bigger: to address climate change and inequality on a deeper, structural level. It’s time to re-think work and security and the value of life. To reject blind pursuit of growth. It is time to build an economy that provides well-being to all—people and species—rather than …

How to not suck at design: a 5 minute guide for the non-designer

From Medium:  Good design principles can be learned and exercised by anyone. This guide will give you a basic knowledge of practical design tips you can apply today (and impress your design friends). If you don’t believe you can learn design, just remember what our legendary friend David Eric Grohl said about learning new things: I never took lessons to play …

The “big hush” and other maps showing what Americans really think about climate and the transition before us

New York Times, 21 March 2017, excerpt by Nadja Popovich, John Schwartz, and Tatiana Schlossberg Americans overwhelmingly believe that global warming is happening, and that carbon emissions should be scaled back. But fewer are sure that the changes will harm them personally. New data released by the Yale Program on Climate Communication gives the most detailed view yet of public opinion …

Take care about moral outrage, say psychologists; it can be self-serving

A cleansing fire: Moral outrage alleviates guilt and buffers threats to one’s moral identity Zachary K. Rothschild, Email author, and Lucas A. Keefer  25 February 2017, DOI: 10.1007/s11031-017-9601-2 Rothschild, Z.K. & Keefer, L.A. Motiv Emot (2017). doi:10.1007/s11031-017-9601-2 Why do people express moral outrage? While this sentiment often stems from a perceived violation of some moral principle, we test the counter-intuitive possibility that moral outrage at third-party transgressions …

Is it worth trying to “reframe” climate change? David Roberts thinks probably not

By David Roberts for vox.com 27 Feb 2017 Climate framing.(Shutterstock) The danger of climate change does not arouse much public passion, certainly nothing like what the facts would warrant. This drives climate campaigners crazy. Always has. So how to get people’s attention? One strategy might be to talk about climate change differently — to “frame” it differently, in the current …

Talk about the weather

By HIROKO TABUCHI 28 Jan 2017, New York Times GLEN ELDER, Kan. — Doug Palen, a fourth-generation grain farmer on Kansas’ wind-swept plains, is in the business of understanding the climate. Since 2012, he has choked through the harshest drought to hit the Great Plains in a century, punctuated by freakish snowstorms and suffocating gales of dust. His planting season starts …

Getting our language right: environmental issues are moral issues and nature is a giver of all life, as sustainer and provider, as having inherent value, imposing responsibility, and deserving gratitude, love, and commitment

George Lakoff: Why Pope Francis Killed It on Addressing Climate Change The Pope combines science, morality and politics. By George Lakoff / AlterNet July 1, 2015 Beginning with my book Moral Politics in 1996 (Ch. 12), I have been arguing that environmental issues are moral issues. There I reviewed and critiqued conservative metaphors of nature as a resource, as property, as …

Transparency in reporting is essential for energy companies but not happening yet

See InsideClimateNews.org for complete article on climate risk in business reporting, 9 Dec 2016 Among the issues being investigated by the attorney general of New York, Eric Schneiderman, in his continuing probe of Exxon, is whether the company has adequately disclosed to investors all that it knows about the risks it faces from climate change. In another development showing how …

US cities consider ways to transform transportation

San Francisco The pilot would try to lure people from their own cars to shared, clean-running electric vehicles, either with drivers or without (if robot cars prove cheap and trusty enough). The carrot? Ease and relative speed. Those in shared rides can use new dedicated carpool lanes (either marked on the pavement or drawn virtually using navigation apps such as …