Fossil fuel subsidies – May 2019 report

Fuel subsidies defy green trend amid rising climate alarm AFP reports that despite warnings of “climate catastrophe” and calls for transitions to green economies, “the world is still spending hundreds of billions of dollars every year to subsidise the fossil fuels that are causing the planet to overheat”. It cites the findings of an International Energy Agency report from last …

Explainer journalism, explained: These days, it is less about producing new information than it is about gathering information already on the record, evaluating it, and explaining and contextualizing it for an audience, with some analysis and argumentation

Journalism is inevitably shifting. These days, it is less about producing new information than it is about gathering information already on the record, evaluating it, and explaining and contextualizing it for an audience, perhaps with some analysis and argumentation for good measure. ** excerpt from David Roberts on vox.com One of the central insights that led Ezra Klein to found Wonkblog at …

How the loss of Native American languages affects our understanding of the natural world

Dance is a unique way of passing on cultural stories to a younger generation.(Aaron Hawkins/Flickr.com- creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/) by ICT OPINION, Apr 26–edited Language loss can be considered as extreme as the extinction of a plant or an animal; once a language is gone, the traditional knowledge it carries also gets erased from society says Rosalyn R. LaPier By Rosalyn R. LaPier Alaska has …

Lessons from comedy when talking about climate change

Even if you’ve never taken an improv class, you can still look to comedy for lessons on speaking up about difficult topics, including climate change. The first step is to learn from Debbie Downer’s most crucial mistake: She doesn’t listen. Other people’s interests aren’t meaningful in their own right, only as cues for spouting dismal facts. Instead, consider Toscano’s approach …

The only way to reach conservatives is through the power to enable people to feel safe and cared for. When people feel safe, they will feel more ready to launch into a national transformation.

…the power to create institutions, ideologies, narratives, and norms that make people feel safe and cared for. When people feel safe, they will feel more ready to launch into a national transformation. And they don’t feel safe in the precarious conditions that American capitalism imposes on them, when they are one lost job or health problem away from disaster. Excerpt …

A majority of Americans favor replacing oil with clean energy

A slim majority (53%) of Americans now have a negative impression of oil companies. The February/March 2019 survey also found Americans are more likely to see oil as domestically available than in prior years, though 60% (up from 45% in 2016) now believe that to improve energy and national security we should reduce demand for oil, compared to 35% who say we …

Adding nuclear increases support for renewables by 10 percent of Republicans, losing only 5 percent of Dems

Overall, renewables are hugely popular. But an all-renewables majority will be a fairly partisan majority.  Allowing for non-renewable, non-emitting sources of energy like nuclear seems to peel off quite a few squishy Republicans, without losing many Democrats or independents. That might mean a broader majority. And a more potent legislative force: This strategy of uniting pro-renewables and pro-nuclear camps has worked to …

Most teachers don’t teach climate change; 4 in 5 parents wish they did

NPR | Anya Kamenetz, April 2019 More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school. …

Shrinking environmental news coverage and local staffing, with newspaper declines in Coal Country and elsewhere.

Shrinking environmental news coverage and local staffing, with newspaper declines in Coal Country and elsewhere. A year ago, the last Kentucky newspaper staffer dedicated to the environmental beat full-time left his job. He was not replaced. By Charles Bethea in the New Yorker, March 26, 2019 An abandoned mining operation in Harlan County, Kentucky, 2018. Photograph by Ross Gordon / Kentucky Documentary …