Utilities Knew: Power Providers Had Info/Acknowledged Impacts of Climate Change 50 Years Ago

8/3/2017 – BY ENERGY AND POLICY INSTITUTE Scientists had begun to warn electric utilities about climate change by 1968, and by 1988 the industry’s official research and development organization had acknowledged that, “There is growing consensus in the scientific community that the greenhouse effect is real.” Despite this early knowledge about climate change, electric utilities have continued to invest heavily in …

Chicago closes coal and invests in transit, cycling, building retrofits, electric buses and more

Rahm Emanuel, The Guardian, 3- August 2017 While the Trump administration is dropping the mantle of leadership on climate change, American cities from coast to coast are picking it up. From small towns to metropolises and from the coasts to the heartland, Republican and Democratic mayors are united in common cause to curb emissions, shrink our carbon footprints and fight for a greener …

The US coal industry is going out, not with a whimper, but with a burst of rent-seeking: “Picking winners” doesn’t look so bad when you’re losing.

Updated by David Roberts@drvoxdavid@vox.com  Aug 26, 2017 “Welcome to the small-government party. What kind of subsidies would you like?” (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) The US coal industry is dying — but not with any dignity. As the end approaches, its sense of aggrieved entitlement is increasingly naked, its demands for government handouts increasingly frantic. As dread builds, shame has left the building. The story …

Carbon Capture & Storage Is Too Expensive For Reducing Power Sector Emissions

The largest problem facing CCS today is cost.  In addition to the costs of an ordinary coal-fired power plant (which in the U.S. is already quite high, about $92 per megawatt-hour [MWh]), a coal plant with CCS requires additional equipment, increasing upfront construction costs, and has additional operations and maintenance (O&M) expenses. Since a considerable amount of energy is required …

Morgan Stanley says the low prices of wind, solar, and grid/battery storage is making “peaker” plants uneconomical

August 16th, 2017 by Steve Hanley on Clean Technica. Source: Forbes   A new report authored by Stephen Byrd, a utility and cleantech analyst at Morgan Stanley, and Adam Jonas, its auto analyst, shows that they are bullish on the market for grid storage products. “Demand for energy storage from the utility sector will grow more than the market anticipates by 2019–2020,” the pair says. They predict …

Residents and workers from a Buffalo suburb collaborate on a plan to follow coal plant closure

Excerpt from the conclusion of a long article in Grist, July 2017 The Huntley Alliance needed clear goals — specifically ones that met the needs of the town’s residents. Through a series of listening sessions, door-to-door surveys, and voter-registration drives, the partnership channeled the hopes and anxieties of hundreds of residents. The wish list that emerged included keeping schools intact, creating …

End of coal: Failure (of us) to plan for it hurts miners most: can we have the dialogue and planning we need?

On a just transition History shows governments that don’t anticipate and make provisions for the decline of coal burden communities for generations Retired coal miner Kenneth Dangerfield, from Morgantown, West Virginia, speaks to Barack Obama’s labour secretary Thomas E. Perez in 2014 (Photo: US Department of Labor) By Oliver Sartor and Andrzej Błachowicz Donald Trump’s decision to pull the US …

Coal CEO admits that ‘clean coal’ is a myth: Coal baron says carbon capture and storage ‘does not work’ and ‘is just cover for the politicians.’

By Joe Romm, Climate Progress, 7 July 2017  Robert Murray, CEO of Murray Energy. CREDIT: AP/Douglas C. Pizac While President Donald Trump continues to tout “clean” coal, coal baron Robert Murray says it’s just a fantasy. “Carbon capture and sequestration does not work. It’s a pseudonym for ‘no coal,’” the CEO of Murray Energy, the country’s largest privately held coal-mining company, …

Top global banks still lend billions to extract fossil fuels

Analysis of world’s lenders reveals many claim green credentials while still financing fuels like tar sands, oil and coal By Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent, The Guardian, 21 June 2017 Some of the world’s top banks are continuing to lend tens of billions for extracting the most carbon-intensive fossil fuels, according to a report of top lenders. Finance provided for these fossil …

India’s renewable energy revolution is racing ahead, announces it will build no more coal plants for at least the next decade

 By Adam Wernick, Living on Earth, 14 June 2017 In 2015, at the climate talks in Paris, India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi spearheaded the launch of an international solar alliance to raise $1 trillion to light up the developing world. Eighteen months later, Modi has turned promise into action. India, a country of 1.3 billion people, is becoming perhaps the world’s …