Links to how bike-friendly slow streets are changing cities

How bike-friendly ‘slow streets’ are changing cities, BBC, Nov 19, 2020 by Mark Johanson Moving around Bogotá can be a bit of a Jekyll-or-Hyde experience. On one hand, the city is infamous for having the world’s worst traffic. Yet, on the other, its cycling infrastructure is considered an exemplary model of sustainable urban mobility, according to the Copenhagenize Index, which ranks bike-friendly …

San Francisco Board of Supervisors votes unanimously to ban gas in new buildings

San Francisco has already banned natural gas for any new city-owned building. Berkeley banned gas in new buildings last year. Natural gas accounts for roughly 40% of San Francisco’s overall emissions of greenhouse gases and 80% of building emissions. Requiring cleaner, all-electric buildings in new construction will increase building safety, reduce emissions citywide, and improve indoor air quality, Mandelman said. …

How to identify visible and invisible surveillance at protests

By Matthew Guariglia, EFF. November 10, 2020 | STRATEGIZE! UPDATE Nov. 5, 2020.  Want a crash course in how to identify surveillance technologies at protests? Watch EFF’s new video presentation on How to Observe Police Surveillance at Protests. The 25-minute video, taught by Senior Investigative Researcher Dave Maass, explains how you can identify various police surveillance technologies, like body-worn cameras, drones, and automated license plate readers, which may …

The popular mandate for a democratic economy in 2020

Isaiah J. Poole, Editorial Manager, The Next System Project more November 3, 2020 DEMOCRACY & GOVERNANCEDEMOCRATIC OWNERSHIPMOVEMENT STRATEGY & HISTORY The economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the U.S. economy have helped increase support for bold public policy interventions that would reverse increased wealth concentration, keep money circulating in local communities, and focus economic aid on small businesses and communities harmed by systemic …

President Trump told suburban voters that affordable housing would hurt property values and increase crime. The story of one Wisconsin community challenges those assumptions.

Residents Feared Low-Income Housing Would Ruin Their Suburb. It Didn’t. Research has shown that tax-credit properties generally do not increase crime in affluent communities. They also tend to have little effect on property values in wealthy neighborhoods Most working-age, able-bodied people receiving government assistance for housing have jobs or were recently employed, according to a report by the Center on Budget and Policy …

Building a carfree neighborhood in an auto-centric area

Culdesac Tempe is a 17-acre lot just across the Salt River from Phoenix. Currently a mess of dust and heavy equipment, the site will eventually feature 761 apartments, 16,000 square feet of retail, 1,000 residents — and exactly zero places for them to park. The people who live there will be contractually forbidden to park a car on site or …

City climate measures and funds would provide home retrofits along with vouchers and rebates for EVs, public transit, and special consideration of low income residents

Towns in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Southern Maine declared climate emergencies this month. The total number of declarations of climate emergency worldwide now totals 1,814 within 30 countries.  The mayor of Berkeley, California, a leading city that declared a climate emergency in 2018, is urging voters to approve Measure HH, which provides funding for the city’s Climate Equity Action Fund. …

Intense multiyear lobbying campaign by Time Warner Cable, AT&T, CenturyLink, and others to bar communities from building their own better, more affordable networks

Millions of dollars bought restrictions that encourage cable and DSL monopolies rather than new choices for residents and businesses BY LISA GONZALEZ , ILSR 3 JAN 2013  After a city in North Carolina built a Fiber-to-the-Home network competing with Time Warner Cable, the cable giant successfully lobbied to take that decision away from other cities. The city of Wilson’s decision and resulting …

3 Hurdles to Racial Justice in Clean Energy – and 3 Ways U.S. Cities Can Overcome Them

by Ted Wong, Lacey Shaver, Eric Mackres and Yeou-Rong Jih – September 02, 2020, WRI,  Comments|Add Comment|Print For years, city governments in the United States have taken the lead on committing to climate action, with more than 165 cities aiming for 100% community-wide clean energy. But whether ambitious goals translate to ambitious action is another question altogether, and unfortunately we’ve seen cities fall short of their commitments before. More recently, …

Pueblo’s Renewable Energy Efforts Meets Resistance, Outspent 50:1 by IOU

By John Farrell, ILSR and Clean Technica, Sept 28, 2020 After a commitment to 100% renewable energy by 2035, the city of Pueblo realized its goal required more change than its current energy provider would enact. Jamie Valdez, community team coordinator of Mothers Out Front and volunteer with the Sierra Club, explains the challenges, triumphs, and lessons learned from facing …