Take back the streets: With people hunkered down at home, cities should act quickly to find a better balance between cars and pedestrians and cyclists

By Justin Gillis and Heather Thompson, NY Times. Ms. Thompson is a transportation planner. June 20, 2020 Since cities came to exist 5,000 years ago, epidemics have shaped their fate. Plagues weakened the Roman Empire and may have helped bring it down. The sewers that cleaned up a filthy London in the 19th century were built in direct response to a cholera outbreak. Many of the great …

Top 5 U.S. Cities For Bicycling and Why

June 18th, 2020 by Cynthia Shahan on Clean Techica The relationship between bicyclists, biking, contentment, and feeling that cheerfulness you lacked before the ride is quite well known to all those who bicycle. Bike commuting is one of the most effective ways to promote general health. People for Bikes has published the top 5 cities, perhaps happier cities than most, for bikes in the US, out of …

These Colorado Cities Are Closing Streets This Summer To Help People Stay Socially Distant

By Nathaniel Minor May 28, 2020, Colorado Public Radio At least a dozen Colorado cities are making plans — or thinking about making plans — to temporarily close streets to give restaurants and other businesses more space to serve their customers.  That supports the state’s new guidelines that allow restaurants to reopen while encouraging more outdoor dining to help ensure social distancing. Some …

Cities like Los Angeles, Denver, and Atlanta saw more than 70% reduction in VMT⁠. Maintenance of even 10% could make dramatic improvements

Smart Cities Dive, June 12, 2020 If cities can maintain even a small fraction of the 50% or more reduction in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) seen in most major metro-areas during the coronavirus pandemic ⁠— with cities like Los Angeles, Denver, and Atlanta seeing a more than 70% reduction in VMT⁠ — the climate impacts could be enormous, according to a new StreetLight Data analysis.  …

Fastest growth in bicycling is among minority populations: Poor and black ‘invisible cyclists’ need to be part of post-pandemic transport planning too

Safety is different for different people, and should be defined by those most economically and legally vulnerable. Prioritize people over profit, property or placemaking. For too long, dominant narratives in mobility advocacy have drawn from the experiences of the most privileged.In advocacy spaces, questions of equity are often treated as an afterthought or sidebar. Advocates “from diverse backgrounds” are often …

E-bikes could cut carbon emissions from transportation in half: greatest opportunities are in rural and suburban settings

May 2020 – A new study titled “E-bike carbon savings – how much and where?” from The Centre for Research in Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS) in the UK concludes that e-bikes could cut carbon emissions from transportation in half, which seems obvious if you can get people to ride them instead of driving gasoline-powered cars. The question is who and how. But much more …

Slow streets are the path to a better city: “overnight, transformed our family life and the lives of our neighbors”

Overnight, slow streets transformed our neighborhood. Everyone should have access to the same opportunity. By Courtney E. Martin in Curbed, May 19, 2020 The first time you watch your kid pedal away from you on two wheels, your hand free from her seat, her wobble small and her confidence grand, is one of those high moments that make all the low moments of parenting …

In Colorado, outdoor recreation is a $28 billion industry that directly generates 229,000 jobs and has become an intrinsic value among Coloradans, with over 70% of residents participating in outdoor recreation each year. Fossil fuel extraction threatens this.

In Colorado, outdoor recreation is a $28 billion industry that directly generates 229,000 jobs and has become an intrinsic value among Coloradans, with over 70% of residents participating in outdoor recreation each year. However, this booming economic sector, which generates $887 billion in national consumer spending annually, is threatened by the Trump administration’s public lands agenda, which has exacerbated speculative oil and gas …

Concerns Grow Over Implementation of State’s New Climate Rules. Also, can we cut back on vehicle use and pollution?

A poll released on February 20 by Colorado College’s State of the Rockies Project found that 70 percent of Colorado voters see climate change as a “serious problem,” up from 63 percent in 2016. Similar percentages of respondents told pollsters that they’re concerned about the environmental impacts of oil and gas development and support a transition to 100 percent clean energy. hin …