Responding to Existential Despair

By Chris Wright, Ahtribune.comAugust 31, 2019 | EDUCATE! Decades ago, Edward Said remarked that contemporary life is characterized by a “generalized condition of homelessness.” Decades earlier, Heidegger had written that “Homelessness is coming to be the destiny of the world.” Around the same time, fascists were invoking the themes of blood and soil, nation, race, community, as intoxicating antidotes to the mass anonymity and depersonalization …

How long will it take to recover from the extinction that we’re causing through climate change and other methods? Millions of years, say scientists, who also urge immediate, decisive action to tackle deoxygenation in oceans

April 2019, EcoWatch It Will Take 10 Million Years to Recover From This Man-Made Apocalypse,  Guest Contributor Apr. 17, 2019 SCIENCE By Jordan Davidson The climate crisis has us spiraling towards higher temperatures while also knocking out marine life and insect species at an alarming rate that continues to accelerate. But, just how long will it take Earth to recover? A new study offers …

Enabling longer, more frequent bike trips

E-bikes mean longer, more frequent bike trips Posted on August 19th, 2019 in NewsTags: bike sharing, e-bikes, health By Robbie Webber On June 18, the Madison, WI, bikesharing system became the first in the U.S. to switch its entire fleet to electric pedal-assist bikes, although other cities have been adding e-bikes to their fleet for several years. Results from a comparison of e-bike vs. standard bike …

What is equitable and cost-effective investment in transportation? How is that changing?

Moving forward, MassDOT plans to target certain bottlenecks while taking a more active role in managing how the roads operate, clearing crashes more quickly, and working to improve people’s travel options throughout the state. New construction and technological solutions will help, but the agency will also evaluate smart pricing strategies in the most congested areas. Rail, bus, and other commuter …

Social factors in walkability: walking while black?

Connectivity is good for walkability, but social factors also matter Posted on September 3rd, 2019 in NewsTags: active transportation, bicycle, crime, pedestrians, safety By Saumya Jain Most efforts to increase bike and walk accessibility focus on physical access. But the built environment is not the full story. A new study finds that certain attributes of the social environment also greatly affect the perception of walkability, especially among people …

Bringing the issues facing family farmers into the national conversation.

This year, five candidates for the Democratic nomination say they support a ban on factory farms. “The 1996 Farm Bill stripped away the last remnants of farm programs that used to ensure farmers were paid fairly in the marketplace by managing production and setting price floors,” Ben Lilliston, the director of rural strategies and climate change at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, …

If kids don’t feel trusted — or if there isn’t anyone close to them whom they can rely on — they can really suffer. Esther Wojcicki, an educator and mother of three explains why trust is essential and how to build it in the young people in our lives

Esther Wojcicki has inspired thousands of kids through her 35-year-and-counting career as a journalism and English teacher at Palo Alto High School in California. She and her husband, Stanley, have also raised three exceptionally accomplished daughters: Susan (YouTube CEO), Janet, a Fulbright-winning anthropologist, pediatrics professor and researcher), and Anne (cofounder and CEO of 23andMe). So she knows quite a bit …

This Company Hired Anyone Who Applied. Now It’s Starting a Movement.

Greyston Bakery uses a practice of open hiring: filling positions on a first-come, first-served basis, no questions asked. Now it wants to teach other companies how to do the same. Fast Company| by Eillie Anzilotti Photos from Greyston. Around 25 years ago, Ty Hookway, founder of the upstate New York-based janitorial services company CleanCraft, was driving past one of their …

And now the really big coal plants begin to close

By Benjamin Storrow, Eenews.net September 3, 2019 | EDUCATE! Old, small plants were the early retirees, but several of the biggest U.S. coal burners—and CO2emitters—will be shuttered by year’s end A new wave of super-polluters headed for the scrap heap. Bruce Mansfield, a massive coal plant in Pennsylvania, emitted nearly 123 million tons between 2010 and 2017. It will be retired by year’s end …

In Colorado, TABOR faces a reckoning with Prop. CC. Here’s what you should know about its impact on state spending

Sept. 4, 2019 Colorado Sun In 1992, Colorado voters decided state government should stop growing. But that didn’t stop them from demanding more public services and spending from their elected officials. That’s the tension at the heart of Proposition CC, this November’s ballot measure to eliminate the state’s revenue caps. It’s the single biggest test to the Taxpayer’s Bill of …