TRB: Scaling Up the Simulated Energy Savings of Connected and Automated Vehicles

The transportation sector (in general) is working on decarbonization a little bit. In relation to AVs

Scaling Up the Simulated Energy Savings of Connected and Automated Vehicles

  • Shams Tanvir, Center for Environmental Research & Technology, UC Riverside
  • Wang, Chao, UC Riverside
  • Peng Hao, UC Riverside
  • Bingrong Sun, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
  • Guoyuan Wu, UC Riverside

Energy and Environmental Implications of Connected and Automated Vehicles: Trends in Industry, Research, Regulations and Policy, Room: Crystal M/N, Tuesday, July 16, 2019: 1:30 PM – 5:30 PM, Orlando FL AV Symposium.

Keynote: Chris Atkinson, Program Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy

Organizers: Morteza Taiebat, University of Michigan, Dimitris Assanis, Assanis & Associates Inc.

Sponsored by: ADC70: TRB Standing Committee on Transportation Energy
ADC70(3): TRB Subcommittee on Energy & Demand Implications of Connected & Automated Vehicles

Session Description: The goal of the session is to explore current issues related to the potential energy and emissions implications of connected and automated vehicle (CAV) technologies. The session aims to understand the  perspectives of consumers and industry participants (automakers and Tier 1 suppliers) and their responses to potential regulatory actions (e.g. off-cycle credits, CAFE, and EV mandates) related to CAVs. The session will engage active researchers and key stakeholders to amalgamate perspectives and create a unifying vision for the adoption of energy-efficient CAVs.  The ultimate goal is to provide robust, policy acceptable solutions that broaden the purpose of CAVs from one primarily driven by safety, mobility and convenience to an implemented (or adopted) technology that also decreases energy and environmental impacts.

Goals/Objectives/Outputs

This session attempts to examine:

  • Several energy saving opportunities enabled by vehicle automation and connectivity.
  • Whether a viable business case exists for including these technologies in production CAVs.
  • Specific policy measures that could create the necessary incentives for auto manufacturers to include these technologies on their vehicles and for consumers to use them to create real-world energy savings.

This session will also identify research needs to guide researchers, policymakers and vehicle manufacturers interested in not only developing energy-savings applications for CAVs, but seeing them adopted by industry and consumers.

Agenda

1:30 PM – 1:45 PM: Opening Remarks

  • Morteza Taiebat, University of Michigan
  • Dimitris Assanis, Assanis & Associates Inc.

1:45 PM – 2:30 PM Distinguished Speaker
NEXT-Generation Energy Technologies for Connected and Automated On-Road Vehicles

  • Dr. Chris Atkinson, Program Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) – U.S. Department of Energy

The distinguished speaker discusses the projects that make up ARPA-E’s NEXTCAR Program, short for “NEXT-Generation Energy Technologies for Connected and Automated On-Road Vehicles,” are enabling technologies that use connectivity and automation to co-optimize vehicle dynamic controls and powertrain operation, thereby reducing energy consumption of the vehicle. Vehicle dynamic and powertrain control technologies, implemented on a single vehicle basis, across a cohort of cooperating vehicles, or across the entire vehicle fleet, could significantly improve individual vehicle and, ultimately, fleet energy efficiency.

2:30 PM – 2:45 PM Networking Break

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM Technical Presentations
10-minute research updates followed by 2 minutes Q&A

Comparing Performance Impacts of Cooperative and Adaptive Cruise Control Field Tests

  • Andrew Eilbert, US DOT Volpe Center
  • Anne-Marie Chouinard, US DOT Volpe Center
  • Tim Tiernan, US DOT Volpe Center
  • Scott B. Smith, US DOT Volpe Center

Co-Optimized Vehicle Dynamic and Powertrain Operation for Energy Efficient Plug-in Hybrid Electric Bus

  • Peng Hao, University of California, Riverside
  • Fei Ye, University of California, Riverside
  • Danial Esaid, University of California, Riverside
  • Guoyuan Wu, University of California, Riverside
  • Kanok Boriboonsomsin, University of California, Riverside
  • Zhiming Gao, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Tim J. LaClair, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Matthew Barth, University of California, Riverside

Impacts of CACC on Corridor Level Vehicle Energy Consumption

  • Hao Liu, PATH Program – University of California, Berkeley
  • Xiao-Yun Lu, PATH Program – University of California, Berkeley
  • Steven Shladover, PATH Program – University of California, Berkeley

Where are we going? Future Energy & Mobility Impacts of Shared, Automated, & Electrified Vehicles

  • Zachary Needell, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Colin Sheppard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Rashid Waraich, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Haitam Laarabi, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Energy Rebound Effect of Automated Vehicles

  • Morteza Taiebat, University of Michigan
  • Samuel Stolper, University of Michigan
  • Ming Xu, University of Michigan

3:45 PM – 4:00 PM Break and Networking

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM Technical Presentations – Continued
10-minute research updates followed by 2 minutes of Q&A

Scaling Up the Simulated Energy Savings of Connected and Automated Vehicles

  • Shams Tanvir, Center for Environmental Research & Technology, UC Riverside
  • Wang, Chao, UC Riverside
  • Peng Hao, UC Riverside
  • Bingrong Sun, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
  • Guoyuan Wu, UC Riverside

Autonomous Electric Vehicle Tool (AEV Tool)  

  • Aditya Pathak, TUMCREATE Ltd.
  • Ganesh Sethuraman, TUMCREATE Ltd.
  • Aybike Ongel, TUMCREATE Ltd.

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies – Mobility Choice (MA3T-MC): Energy Impact Analysis of CAV, Shared Mobility and Electric Vehicle

  • Fei Xie, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Zhenhong Lin, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

SAV & SAEV Impacts on Energy Use and Emissions Across the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Region

  • Haonan Yan, University of Texas at Austin
  • Kara Kockelman, University of Texas at Austin

4:45 PM – 5:15 PM Open Questions & Future Directions

  • Moderator: Dr. Chris Atkinson, Program Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) – U.S. Department of Energy

House Transportation funding passes the house

Good news for BUILD and transit capital grants

On June 25, the House of Representatives passed fiscal year 2020 transportation appropriations. We’re happy with it: the day before the vote, we sent a letter to Congress with over 200 signatures from elected officials and organizations asking for representatives to fund transit at or above FAST Act authorized levels. The resulting bill is fairly consistent with those policy asks in our letter.

Here are some pieces of the bill we’re happy with:

  • Increasing the BUILD planning grant set-aside by $5 million, from $15 million to $20 million;
  • Ensuring that U.S. territories are eligible for planning grants for areas of persistent poverty in the BUILD program and Transit Infrastructure Grants account;
  • Reinforcing the Congressional intent of the transit Capital Investment Grant program, which the Trump administration has been intentionally slowing down by failing to approve and process transit projects in a timely manner.

The Senate has yet to take up this annual funding bill, but when they do, we—and the 200+ signatories to our letter—hope they’ll follow the House’s lead.

Our letter also addresses the long-term transportation authorization that expires next year and for which Congress is already starting to prepare. These long-term laws set federal transportation policy (not just funding levels) for the entire country—how much we spend on highways or transit, whether we’ll get serious about fixing our infrastructure first, and whether we’ll take concrete steps to end preventable deaths on our roadways. Our clear message to Congress: The status quo isn’t working; Congress must rethink the federal transportation program to focus on connecting people to jobs and opportunity, keeping everyone safe, and improving equity. Read the full letter > >