Philippines seeks compensation from oil majors for human rights damages related to 2013 super typhoon Yolanda, which resulted in the deaths of more than 6,000 people

According international reports, the Philippines’ Commission on Human Rights has issued a complaint directed at 47 of the world’s largest carbon-emitting companies. The action is potentially seeking compensation for human rights damages related to 2013 super typhoon Yolanda, which resulted in the deaths of more than 6,000 people.

Philioppines shutterstock_327873524Triple Pundit has reported the governments of other developing countries will watch closely concerning the outcomes of this action.

The country’s Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has accused these companies of emitting greenhouse gases to such an extent they have violated the human rights of millions of people living in this archipelago.

Companies named in the complaint include Shell, Total, Rio Tinto, Respol, EnCana, Yukos, Cemex, and Massey Energy (which was acquired by Alpha Natural Resources).

Co-signing the CHR’s petition were over a dozen NGOs based in the Philippines, including

The CHR’s 60-page document demands accountability and answers from some of the world’s oldest and largest multinationals, as well as state-owned firms. The World Bank designated the Southeast Asian expanse of 7,100 islands as one of the world’s most “vulnerable” countries in terms of susceptibility to natural disasters attributed to climate change.

According to the report, “…this petition is a signal that the world’s largest companies — especially those that prove obstinate when it comes to climate change science — are on notice. Developing countries often view climate change as a problem generated by richer nations that created a mess for which they have refused to take responsibility.”