Will Washington be the first US state to have a carbon tax?

Re-posted from the Christian Science Monitor Yoram Bauman is the world’s only “stand-up economist.” He makes his living poking fun at his own profession. But he’s dead serious about fighting climate change, and he’s the intellectual force behind a climate-related initiative that seems likely to appear on Washington state’s November 2016 ballot, an initiative that would implement the first carbon tax in …

Creating a Practical Sequence of Climate Policies

Re-posting most of David Roberts’ brilliance from his recent article on Vox. Debates over policy often proceed in a kind of vacuum, ignoring the political forces that shape the trajectory and character of policymaking. A new analysis in Science tries to counter this tendency in the area of climate policy, urging analysts to strategically consider the political effects of various policy …

86% of cities see an economic opportunity in climate change, many switching to 100% renewables

While countries have dragged their feet for years on meaningful climate action, many cities around the world have forged ahead with sustainability efforts. In July, about 60 mayors pledged to fight climate change at a two-day conference hosted by Pope Francis. Several cities have even made impressive strides to ditch fossil fuels in favor of renewables. Two recent reports have confirmed that …

Morgan Stanley’s Longstanding Financing Relationships with Worst Offenders from Coal-mining Industry Challenged

Morgan Stanley is the next major investment bank being targeted with a public campaign to demand that the bank commit to stop financing coal mining and coal-fired power.  “Morgan Stanley has longstanding financing relationships with some of the worst offenders from the global coal mining industry, including Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private sector coal mining company,” said Ben Collins, …

Cost of Permafrost Melting conservatively estimated at $43 Trillion over the next two centuries

Re-posted from The Washington Post.  To read the full article, go to this link. Scientists estimate that Arctic permafrost could contain 1,700 gigatons (which is equal to 1.7 trillion tons) of carbon. The release of some of this carbon, even gradually, could have dramatic consequences for the climate, leading to an acceleration in global climate change, more warming in the Arctic, and …

Nearly half of the world’s top 100 global companies are trying to subvert climate policies by lobbying, advertising, and influence-peddling but BP tops the list in Europe

Re-posted from The Guardian Company emerges as Europe’s worst climate policy wrecker, according to a new table ranking firms by their records on lobbying and opposition Nearly half of the world’s top 100 global companies are trying to subvert climate policies by lobbying, advertising, and influence-peddling, said the UK-based non-profit, Influence Map. But while all the major fossil fuel firms …

Exxon Confirmed Global Warming Consensus in 1982, but then campaigned to stop global action to reduce fossil fuel emissions

By Lisa Song, Neela Banerjee, David Hasemyer, Sep 22, 2015 In 1982, Exxon scientist Andrew Callegari put together a presentation on Exxon modeling results including the chart pictured here. Steve Knisely was an intern at Exxon Research and Engineering in the summer of 1979 when a vice president asked him to analyze how global warming might affect fuel use.  “I think …

Massachusetts Thinks They Can Copy Denmark’s Progress

Massachusetts legislators are talking about learning from Denmark’s progress. Denmark has set a target of becoming independent from fossil fuels by 2050, and is on track to generate one-third of its power from clean energy – such as wind and biomass – by 2020. According to the Danish government, the use of renewable energy rose from 3 percent in 1980 …