Heat Waves Creeping Toward a Deadly Heat-Humidity Threshold

As global temperatures rise, river valleys in South Asia will face the highest risk of heat waves that reach the limits of human survivability, a new study shows. BY BOB BERWYN, INSIDECLIMATE NEWS AUG 3, 2017 Heat waves that are dangerous now will get worse as global temperatures rises. A new study looks at the risks for global hot spots with …

Utility as a B-corp

By Diane Cardwell, NYTimes.com, 29 July 2017 – Utility Helps Wean Vermonters From the Electric Grid: Green Mountain Power is trying to turn homes, neighborhoods and towns into virtual power plants, driven by economics as well as environmental goals. WALTHAM, Vt. — In a new low-income development that replaced a trailer park here, rooftop solar panels sparkle in the sun while backup batteries …

How can we take control of the resources we need to survive?

By Anna Coote, New Economics Foundation Should resources essential for human survival be placed in the control of the people who need them? What would this mean in practice – and how could it be achieved? At the New Economics Foundation we are opening up a broad debate about the control of ‘the commons’ – the resources we rely upon …

Iowa DOT I-80 Automated Corridors Study

The Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) is conducting a planning study of the rural portions of the Interstate 80 corridor to best address safety and mobility needs of all freight and passenger travelers (Planning Study). This study is being conducted using the federally adopted Planning and Environmental Linkage (PEL) Study process. The Planning Study will allow near-term improvements to be …

To Protect Voting, Use Open-Source Software

By R. JAMES WOOLSEY and BRIAN J. FOX, New York Times, AUG. 3, 2017 CreditEric Thayer for The New York Times  Although Russian hackers are reported to have tried to disrupt the November election with attacks on the voting systems of 39 states, the consensus of the intelligence community is that they were probably unsuccessful in their efforts to delete and alter voter data. But another …

The history of “court costs” and legitimizing ongoing slavery

Extra Newsfeed, Sep 2017 In the post-Civil War South, a system came up when plantations, factories, or mines needed workers. It was based on that clever little exception in the 13th Amendment: Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place …

76% of people in the world get most of their protein from plants. With increased CO2 in atmosphere though, the protein content of rice, wheat, barley, and potatoes is decreasing by 6-14% by 2050

By Marlene Cimons, Nexus Media, August 2017  We already know how prolonged drought, high heat and heavy rains prompted by climate change can wreak havoc on agriculture. But there is more disturbing news. If we do nothing, growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide from emissions will seriously impair the nutritional value of wheat, rice and other staple crops, putting millions of …

The Future of Energy Pricing

By Fereidoon Sionshansi. Originally published on Energy Post. Sept 2017 The rapid transformation of the electricity sector will make it necessary for utilities to adopt radically new pricing methods, writes Fereidoon Sionshansi, publisher of newsletter EEnergy Informer and editor of a new book, Innovation & Disruption at the Grid’s Edge. According to Sionshansi, existing volumetric tariffs will increasingly be replaced by fixed service fees. …

“Ice Battery” Technology Cuts Peak Power Consumption by up to 95%

By Sophie Vorrath, August 2017 Originally published on RenewEconomy. US-made thermal “ice battery” energy storage technology that could dramatically change the way people cool their homes in summer – potentially cutting household peak power consumption by up to 95% – is poised to take on the Australian market, through a distribution deal with local solar hot water company Apricus. California-based Ice …

Solar supporting agriculture

From NexusMedia.org August 2017 Increasingly, solar companies are working with farmers to install solar panels on their land. Photovoltaic arrays are decidedly low-impact, meaning farmers can continue to raise livestock or grow crops on land covered in solar panels. Many farmers are turning to solar to cut electricity costs. A lemon and avocado grower in California relies on two photovoltaic arrays to save …