Allergy, oak pollen and ragweed seasons growing with climate change

More children could wind up in hospital emergency rooms suffering from allergy-induced asthma if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and cause longer oak pollen seasons, according to a new study. The new research finds that if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase through the end of this century, the oak pollen season in some areas could extend by up …

Declining precipitation in Colorado River Basin worsened by rising temperatures

Scientists found that another factor affected the runoff ratio: temperature. Over the last few centuries, the runoff ratio was reduced when temperatures were warmer. And the influence of temperature strengthened during drier years: When the snowpack was shallow, warm temperatures reduced the runoff ratio more than when the snowpack was deep, further exacerbating drought conditions. The low runoff ratios seen …

Low hedges along roads instead of taller trees, help air pollution and health

Science Daily, 16 May 2017 The harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found. The study, just published in the journal Atmospheric Environment, points out that low hedges reduce the impact of pollution from vehicles in cityscapes …

Electricity customers pay for groups that lobby against clean energy, says report: Paying for Utility Politics

By Mark Hand, Climate Progress, 12 May 2017, Electricity customers pay for groups that lobby against clean energy.  Successful oversight of trade group membership dues has faded away in many states, report says. In this April 22, 2015, photo, Nevada residents protest proposal that could curtail rooftop solar in the state. The rooftop solar debate has pitted solar developers against electric …

Ancient carbon in the tundra, an Arctic carbon-freezer, is melting

By Joe Romm, Climate Progress, 15 May 2017 The permafrost, or tundra, has been a very large carbon freezer. For a very long time, it has had a very low decomposition rate for the carbon-rich plant matter. But we’ve been leaving the freezer door wide open and are witnessing the permafrost being transformed from a long-term carbon locker to a …

Renewable energy is ‘unstoppable’, declares Financial Times:  ‘Fossil fuels have lost. The rest of the world just doesn’t know it yet.’

At least 14 battery gigafactories are being built or planned, nine in China.  Joe Romm shares some highlights from a new, must-read, 4000-word article in the Financial Times, “The Big Green Bang: how renewable energy became unstoppable.” Traditional energy companies and mainstream financial publications are finally waking up to the new reality: The shift to renewable energy, electric cars, and …

Just 10 of these printers could print enough flexible solar PV to power 1000 homes per day, current cost is $10/square meter

By Steve Hanley, Clean Technica, 17 May 2017 Researchers At Australia’s University Of Newcastle Testing Printed Solar Panels A team of researchers headed by Professor Paul Dastoor at the University of Newcastle in Australia has begun testing printed solar panels. The experimental panels are made by printing a special electronic ink onto clear laminated sheets as thin as a single piece …

No one can deny that something big is happening to the automotive industry. Companies like Nissan, Ford, Honda, and Zipcar are all entering the electric automotive race to offer sustainable cars that meet consumer demands, government regulations, and stand up to the gas-powered vehicle. Take a look at Tesla, which has a permanent spotlight on its all-electric cars. From its flagship Model S …

Volvo Cars CEO: Newest generation of diesel engines likely to be our last

By James Ayre, Clean Technica, 20 May 2017 Before then backtracking a bit for whatever reason, the CEO of Volvo Cars was quoted by Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung as saying that the company’s current generation of diesel engines was likely its last. The quote from the CEO, Hakan Samuelsson, read: “From today’s perspective, we will not develop any more new-generation …