Nearly half of the states in the U.S. are examining or planning to examine at least some element of the value of distributed generation. Also, more states enact community solar legislation

Excerpt from http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/46-states-took-policy-action-on-solar-in-2015

Nearly half of the states in the U.S. are examining or planning to examine at least some element of the value of distributed generation.

Maine is far from a leading solar state, yet its Public Utilities Commission already conducted a value-of-solar study that found the value was $0.33 cents per kilowatt-hour, far higher than the average retail rate. Minnesota set a value-of-solar tariff in 2014 and has opened a grid modernization proceeding at the state level.

For a few leading states, such as Hawaii and New York, the goal is not just to value solar more broadly, but to entirely rethink the value of grid services on the distribution level.

In other states, it’s far narrower. In Florida and Ohio, the study notes that the solar studies were performed with the primary goal of providing information to commissioners. In West Virginia and Oregon, the proceedings only looked at the cost-shifting element of net metering.

A trend on the horizon that will require more states to take a look at solar policies is community solar. Only seven states and the District of Columbia had policy action on community solar, but another seven states have enacted community solar legislation.

Graph: NC Clean Energy Technology Center

With many states taking a closer look at solar, it is possible that some won’t wait as long to lay out comprehensive policy for community solar as they have when it comes to rooftop solar. Even so, given the different regulatory drivers in each state, there will likely only be more variation rather than consensus in the future.