Candidates Debate Climate in Sixth Democratic Debate, The Short Word on Nuclear

By Olivia Rosane Dec. 20, 2019, POLITICS The climate crisis had its strongest showing to date in the sixth Democratic primary debate hosted by Politico and PBS in Los Angeles Thursday. For the first time, a climate question was asked during the first 30 minutes of the debate, HuffPost reported. The issue got 13 minutes total of discussion time, according to Grist, and those …

The water-energy nexus at rivers can be resolved worldwide by 2050 as a consequence of the energy transition

Water-energy nexus can be resolved for thermal power plants #100RE. 96% of global thermal PP and 330 rivers are individually traced. 98% of water consumption can be avoided Water and energy are closely related, particularly in the current electricity generation based on thermal coal, gas, oil and nuclear power. The so-called water-energy nexus is a significant sustainability concern. However, a …

Slimy lakes and dead dogs: climate crisis has brought the season of toxic algae

Warming water and pollution are contributing to a variety of harmful bacteria that can wreak havoc on aquatic environments Susie Cagle in San Francisco 19 Sep 2019, The Guardian From New York City to coastal California, a poison-producing living slime is overtaking waterways and shorelines, killing pets, ravaging tourism markets and making its way into local drinking water. So far this …

Beautification and stormwater management:

NYC doubles curbside rain gardens in green infrastructure program By Chris Teale@chris_teale, in Smart Cities Dive, Aug. 30, 2019 New York City will double the size of its green infrastructure program by building more than 5,000 curbside rain gardens, adding to the more-than 4,000 that have already been installed around the city. The curbside rain gardens soak up stormwater to mitigate local …

We’re Grossly Underestimating the World’s Water Access Crisis

Jillian Du, Diana Mitlin, Victoria A. Beard and David Satterthwaite – August 13, 2019, WRI.org Print In Cape Town, South Africa, and Chennai, India, “Day Zero” events where cities run out of water have drawn global media attention. But while these catastrophes seem like rare, temporary crises caused by droughts or mismanagement, life without ample water is actually a daily reality for millions of people, even in cities …

Toledo Passed a “Lake Erie Bill of Rights” To Protect Its Water. The State Is Trying to Stop It. A local effort to protect environmental rights—of both people and nature—faces pushback from the state and industry

Algae blooms are increasingly common in Lake Erie, caused in large part by runoff from industrial factory farms and warming waters. Things have become so bad that there are now algae “forecasts” predicting how large the algae bloom will be each year. Large-scale toxic blooms are once again afflicting the lake, in summer 2019. A sign warns bathers about algae …

Rising water stress will affect plants: if the water potential and vapor pressure are larger in the atmosphere – water will dissipate faster and stronger from soil and plants

The increased growth rate of plants seen worldwide in response to rising CO2 levels – a phenomenon known as “global greening” – could be stalled by growing water stress, a study finds. Global warming is driving changes to water vapour levels, the research finds, which could, in turn, be affecting the rate of plant photosynthesis – the process underpinning plant growth. Article …

‘Biggest Crisis No One Is Talking About’: Quarter of Humanity Faces ‘Extremely High Water Stress’ Intensified by Climate Emergency

“Water stress is the biggest crisis no one is talking about. Its consequences are in plain sight in the form of food insecurity, conflict and migration, and financial instability.” August 06, 2019 by Common Dreams A child sits in an area affected by a drought in the southern outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in 2016. In the same area this September, …

Groundwater pumping has been absolutely unregulated in California for the state’s entire history, despite water being arguably its most important resource

Excerpt from NYTimes.com, June 12, 2019 …when the inevitable multiyear droughts set in, farmers must rely on excessive groundwater pumping to irrigate those endlessly expanding acres of fruit and nut trees, endangering the vast underground aquifer that is arguably the state’s most valuable natural resource. Given California’s reputation for legislative overkill, it’s astonishing that groundwater pumping has been absolutely unregulated …