From Oslo to Paris, these major cities have plans to go car-free

From Oslo to Paris, these major cities have plans to go car-free.  This article is published in collaboration with Business Insider. Oslo and Madrid will implement major car free areas by 2019. Madrid plans to ban cars from 500 acres of its city center by 2020, with urban planners redesigning 24 of the city’s busiest streets for walking rather than …

Cities outgrowing the automobile: Sharing is the new paradigm. Tomorrow, you will judge a city according to what it is adding to sharing. The more that we have people sharing transportation modes, public space, information and new services, the more attractive the city will be

By Stephen Moss, excerpt from The Guardian 28 April 2015 Lyon, France Vesco, the politician responsible for sustainable transport in Lyon, played a leading role in introducing the city’s Vélo’v bike-sharing scheme a decade ago. It has since been replicated in cities all over the world. Now, though, he is convinced that digital technology has changed the rules of the game, …

Build more housing and less parking near transit

Governing Magazine’s February 2017 issue says a A Low-Cost Solution to Traffic is building housing that limits how far people have to drive in the first place — building more housing close to the urban cores — or, at least, close to the dense suburban job centers. Urban planners often argue for locating more housing along high-frequency transit lines, which makes sense …

Suburbs increasingly view their auto-centric sprawl as a health hazard

By Katherine Shaver December 28, 2016, from the Washington Post Planners in Prince George’s County have talked for years about reshaping communities to help residents fetch a gallon of milk via a walk or bicycle ride, rather than add to stifling traffic congestion by having to drive. But planners say they’re increasingly treating the Maryland county’s low-density, auto-dependent design as …

Winner of Best US Street Transformation in 2016

Best Street Transformation of 2016 Is… From StreetsBlog, By Angie Schmitt Dec 30, 2016 Last week we asked readers to choose their favorite American street transformation of 2016. Six finalists were in the running. These projects sped up bus trips for tens of thousands of riders (San Francisco), improved critical links in city bike networks (Chicago, Atlanta, and Oakland), and healed an old downtown freeway scar (Rochester). Our …

Cyclists Are Winning Commuting

They’re more likely than drivers, walkers, and straphangers to get to work on time and feeling good.  By ANDREW SMALL, cross-posted from City Lab, Dec 23, 2016 Lucas Jackson/Reuters With so many commuting choices—bikes, trains, buses, and those god-forsaken, gas-guzzling death-boxes also known as cars—and so many variables—cost, time, distance, traffic, and weather conditions—we transit nerds at CityLab are constantly reconsidering …

Walkscore and Sidewalk Science:  The peculiar habits of the pedestrian, explained

By Tom Vanderbilt, on Slate.com …Tregoning envisions Walk Score as a kind of divining rod for developers and officials, a tool that could help them spot opportunities in places that are about to “tip” into walkable urbanism. Tysons Corner, Va., is an archetypal “Edge City,” one of those centerless clusters of office parks and corporate headquarters located a few highway …

The crisis in American walking:  How we got off the pedestrian path

By Tom Vanderbilt on Slate A few years ago, at a highway safety conference in Savannah, Ga., I drifted into a conference room where a sign told me a “Pedestrian Safety” panel was being held. The speaker was Michael Ronkin, a French-born, Swiss-raised, Oregon-based transportation planner whose firm, as his website notes, “specializes in creating walkable and bikeable streets.” Ronkin began …

Want to see what transportation in LA might look like in 40 years?

Want to see what public transportation in LA might look like in the year 2057? Metro has just released a draft report on how it plans to spend the $120 billion in revenue it would generate from its sales tax increase ballot measure. It’s chock full of financial details, but more enticingly, Metro lays out the plan for the next …

Lack of sidewalks is a health issue

By Amie Gray Koch, cross-posted from the Raleigh News Observer – Opinion, 25 Nov 2016 During my daily visits to ill patients throughout Durham County, it is staunchly apparent that many low income neighborhoods often predominately high in racial and ethnic minorities, have no proper functional sidewalks. As a nurse practitioner who provides home visits to patients I see a blatant …