Pedestrianization and bike planning for streets with 7000 citizen proposals. New USDOT Pedestrian Planning

How can a city re-envision chaotic, car-covered streets into activity-ladden, people-focused spaces? The New York Times combined the experience of residents enjoying the city’s Open Streets with thoughts from WXY Urban Planner and Architect Clair Weisz into an interactive reveal of what pedestrianization looks like. Over 100 years ago, the dangerous “Jaywalking” campaign was created by automakers to put the …

What Would Providing Every City with High-Quality, Zero-Emissions Public Transportation Look Like? Also first USDOT Ped Safety Plan

A major investment in transit would be pricey but would drastically improve access and quality. Improving transit quality in every urban area to, at minimum, conditions in the Dallas region would cost an additional $2.2 billion annually. This would be a 4.5 percent increase nationally in operating budgets but would expand per capita transit service by 30.3 percent for the …

The post-pandemic transportation system has to reward transit riders, bicyclists and pedestrians with safe, efficient and comfortable ways to travel – starting with restoring bus and rail service cuts for transit-dependent riders

By THE LA TIMES EDITORIAL BOARD DEC. 16, 2020 Here’s one more way that COVID-19 could leave a lasting mark: The pandemic has decimated public transit. Without swift action to restore bus and rail service and a serious commitment to building transit-friendly communities, Los Angeles will suffer from ever-worsening traffic, air pollution, carbon emissions and inequality long after the coronavirus is …

Are intersections keeping people from choosing to walk, roll and bike? Yes!

By Amy Kenreich and Shelley McMullen, StreetsBlog, Dec 9, 2020 Are intersections keeping people from choosing to walk, roll and bike? (Streetsblog Denver) West Wash Park resident Kate Gotter worries about crossing Alameda Avenue every time she takes her three children to school. “It’s like playing Frogger. The signal at Pearl is our best option, but most of the time the …

Building a carfree neighborhood in an auto-centric area

Culdesac Tempe is a 17-acre lot just across the Salt River from Phoenix. Currently a mess of dust and heavy equipment, the site will eventually feature 761 apartments, 16,000 square feet of retail, 1,000 residents — and exactly zero places for them to park. The people who live there will be contractually forbidden to park a car on site or …

Pedestrian and Bicycle Funding Opportunities

U.S. Department of Transportation Transit, Highway, and Safety Funds, Revised August 9, 2018 https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/bicycle_pedestrian/funding/funding_opportunities.cfm This table indicates potential eligibility for pedestrian and bicycle projects under U.S. Department of Transportation surface transportation funding programs. Additional restrictions may apply. See notes and basic program requirements below, and see program guidance for detailed requirements. Project sponsors should fully integrate nonmotorized accommodation into surface …

9 Reasons to Eliminate Jaywalking Laws Now

They’ve rarely protected pedestrians, and their enforcement is racially biased. Two street safety experts say there are better ways to curb traffic violence. Angie Schmitt and Charles T. Brown October 16, 2020 On Sept. 23, Kurt Andreas Reinhold, a 42-year-old Black man, was trying to cross a street in San Clemente, California, when two officers from a special “homeless outreach unit” stopped him. …

Why Your City Doesn’t Map Its Worst Car Crashes: The idea of a “High Injury Network” isn’t new. But a surprising number of cities don’t bother to map it

By Kea Wilson, StreetsBlog, Sep 29, 2020 Time for a pop quiz! (Don’t worry, it’s open book: feel free to hop on Google.) What are the 10 most dangerous intersections or corridors for pedestrians in your city, and what percentage of total crashes occur in these areas? If you don’t know the answer, and can’t easily can’t find it using the …

New Study Shows That SUVs Remain ‘Disproportionately Likely To Kill’

By Lloyd AlterUpdated July 16, 2020 Ford has just proudly introduced a new, updated version of the Bronco, the company’s Jeep-like off-road capable SUV that was killed in the late 90s. It might seem like an odd time, in the middle of a climate crisis; as Aaron Gordon notes in Vice, “every driver who ‘upgrades’ from a sedan to an SUV is …