Interview with Robin Chase, Aug 2018

From The Beam and Clean Technica, 24 Aug 2018 An interview with ZipCar founder Robin Chase, by Anne-Sophie Garrigou Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur who became famous for co-founding Zipcar, the largest carsharing company in the world. The successful entrepreneur wasn’t about to stop there, going on to co-found Buzzcar, a peer-to-peer carsharing service in France (now merged with Drivy); as …

Stock Buybacks Starving the Economy: A new report finds that big companies could have given their workers thousands of dollars’ worth of raises with the money they spent on their own shares.

“How much might workers have benefited if companies had devoted their financial resources to them rather than to shareholders? Lowe’s, CVS, and Home Depot could have provided each of their workers a raise of $18,000 a year, the report found. Starbucks could have given each of its employees $7,000 a year, and McDonald’s could have given $4,000 to each of …

The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy: The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.

By MATTHEW STEWART in the Atlantic, May 2018 The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy: The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.   1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around Christmas, more often …

Guaranteed jobs

Electric Power Board technicians work on Chattanooga’s smart grid. (AP Photo via S&C Electric Company / Christopher Berkey) Progressives have begun to dream more boldly. We have graduated from a public option to single payer. From lower sentences to eliminating cash bail. From motor-voter to automatic-voter registration. From affordable to free college. And from a $15 minimum wage to guaranteed good …

Considerations for the future of alternative welfare systems

From https://blog.p2pfoundation.net/basic-income-in-the-long-now-three-critical-considerations-for-the-futures-of-alternative-welfare-systems/2018/02/14 By imbuing the UBI debate with a more systems-oriented and commons perspective, I have argued that an important shift is made from income and work as such to deeper interrelated questions of 1.) rights, capabilities and effective access; 2.) forms of deliberation, governance, entrepreneurship, collective care and accounting; 3.) forms and scales of pooling resources and work, and; 4.) …

Why millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression

Dec 2017, By Michael Hobbes Today, they’re almost all indirect hires, employees of random, anonymous contracting companies: Laundry Inc., Rent-A-Guard Inc., Watery Margarita Inc. In 2015, the Government Accountability Office estimated that 40 percent of American workers were employed under some sort of “contingent” arrangement like this—from barbers to midwives to nuclear waste inspectors to symphony cellists. Since the downturn, …

Black Labor Convening on Just Transition

Black Labor Convening on Just Transition, held, December 11-12, 2017, Hilton Garden Inn Raleigh-Durham Research Triangle, 4620 South Miami Blvd., Durham, North Carolina, 27703, USA African American communities, including workers, are most likely to be exposed to the pollution from fossil fuel based energy production through coal plants, oil and gas refineries, as well as pollution from energy production through nuclear facilities and waste incinerators. …

Could a Universal Basic Income Make Small Town America Great Again?

Sebastian Johnson on Medium.com Oct 2017  In the summer of 2013, I undertook a field study of sorts with my graduate school classmates in Southside, Virginia. Our hope was to see the theories we’d learned in classes on local economic development and regional economies put to practice. We spent a week roaming through towns like Floyd and Martinsville; observing business incubators in Blacksburg and Danville; …

Poverty in America

Over three-quarters of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, and about half of this group has reported “material hardship” (running out of food [or worrying about running out of food], not being able to afford a place to live or medical treatment, or having utilities turned off). Worse yet, they don’t have savings to handle the future or crises that arise, whether plumbing, car repairs, …