Sedate a Plant, and It Seems to Lose Consciousness. Is It Conscious?

By JOANNA KLEIN 2 Feb 2018, NYTimes In an experiment, scientists sedated plants like the Venus fly trap. When the drugs wore off, the plants came back to life, almost as if they were regaining consciousness. CreditKen Yokawa, et al. Plants don’t get enough credit. They move. You know this. Your houseplant salutes the sun each morning. At night, it returns to center. …

20 percent more trees in megacities would mean cleaner air and water, lower carbon and energy use

18 Jan 2018   read full ScienceDaily article here Planting 20 percent more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, like pollution reduction, carbon sequestration and energy reduction, according to a study in Ecological Modelling. The authors of the study, which was carried out at Parthenope University of Naples in Italy, say city planners, residents and other stakeholders should …

Roots of Prosperity: The Economics and Finance of Restoring Land

by Helen Ding, Sofia Faruqi, Andrew Wu, Juan-Carlos Altamirano, Andrés Anchondo Ortega, René Zamora Cristaless This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the benefits and costs of restoring forests and landscapes in countries around the world, demonstrating how smart policies and innovative financing can help governments meet their restoration targets. The authors find that finance, both public and private, for restoration is inadequate for seven reasons, …

Research shows that every $1 invested in restoring degraded land generates an estimated $7–$30 in economic benefits

Be Helen Ding, Sofia Faruqi, Caroline Gagné and Andrés Anchondo Ortega – December 19, 2017 WRI   Costa Rica is a restoration success story. Photo by Aaron Minnick/WRI Trees are obviously good for the planet. What’s not so clear to most people—governments, NGOs, investors, the public—are their socioeconomic benefits. Trees are essential for the economy, our health and our wellbeing. , including improved food production, carbon sequestration, and …

City trees suffer from not getting enough sleep

CC BY 2.0 Max Pixel Streetlights and other city circumstances lead to poor health and prevent urban trees from being all that they can be. From the “Trees, They’re Just Like Us!” department, my favorite forester has weighed in on an issue I have long suspected: Urban trees, like much of the natural world, have a hard time when the …

When the trees disappear from the outskirts of the forest, it creates significant local warming and changes air circulation patterns throughout the Amazon area during the dry season leading to more loss

The ongoing deforestation around the fringes of the Amazon may have serious consequences for the untouched deeper parts of the rainforest. A new research study shows that it is not only the climate that is adversely affected by deforestation. In fact, the very stability of the ecosystem in the entire Amazon region is altered when deforestation takes place in the …

The Earth Has Lungs. Watch Them Breathe.

Robert Krulwich’s excellent program, RadioLab is now one of the most widely downloaded weekly podcasts.  His blog from 9 March 2016 is below What a difference a leaf makes! Well, not one leaf. We have 3.1 trillion trees on our planet—that’s 422 trees per person. If we count all the leaves on all those trees and take a look at …