Satellite map of world’s tropical forests

A unique satellite dataset on the world’s tropical forests is now available for all to see and use. (Oct 2020, BBC) It’s a high-resolution image map covering 64 countries that will be updated monthly. Anyone who wants to understand how trees are being managed will be able to download the necessary information for analysis – for free. The Norwegian government is funding …

Paul Klee on Creativity, or How an Artist is Like a Tree

BY MARIA POPOVA Since we first came down from the trees, we have been looking at them and seeing ourselves, seeing lush metaphors for our own deepest existential concerns — metaphors for the secret to lasting love, metaphors for what it means to live with authenticity, metaphors for finding infinity in our solitude. Trees have been of especial enchantment and self-clarification to artists. “The …

Just being outside is healthy! Scientists Discover a Major Lasting Benefit of Growing Up Outside the City: The childhood experience of green space can actually predict mental health in later life

Using data from 3,585 people collected across four cities in Europe, scientists from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (also called IS Global) report a strong relationship between growing up away from the natural world and mental health in adulthood. Overall, they found a strong correlation between low exposure to nature during childhood and higher levels of of nervousness and …

Regenerative Agriculture: Good for Soil Health, but Limited Potential to Mitigate Climate Change

Much of the recent limelight for agricultural emissions reductions shines on one option that our report found had limited potential: increasing carbon sequestration in soils through practices broadly referred to as “regenerative agriculture.” …if the world fails to reduce emissions in other sectors like energy and transport, we’ll need to rely ever more heavily on land solutions, exacerbating food and …

Trees cool air, slow runoff, and boost students and public health. Should trees be seen as a public utility which all must be able to access?

Benefits of trees include slowing stormwater runoff, cooling air temperatures, and even boosting student achievement and public health. Trees capture more than a third of rainfall, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), easing the strain on flooding and stormwater infrastructure. Their shade helps lower energy use by nearly half, according to the EPA, while reducing carbon emissions by …

Rainforest being cut down at the rate of 1 acre per second, and response

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/10/14/the-musks-embrace-the-challenge-of-climate-change/ – excerpt below The rainforest was being cut down at the rate of 1 acre per second. That really hit me. Every second going by was another acre of rainforest lost! The complex ecology of a rainforest is too much for this short article, but it would take 150 to 200 years for a rainforest to regenerate if it …

Grasslands More Reliable Carbon Sink Than Trees

Tree initiative in Denver – further down. In Wildfire-Prone California, Grasslands a Less Vulnerable Carbon Offset Than Forests. Increased drought and wildfire risk make grasslands more reliable carbon sinks than trees Grasslands should be given opportunities in state’s cap-and-trade market as long-term investment By Kat Kerlin | Jul 9, 2018 Forests have long served as a critical carbon sink, consuming about a quarter of …

11 facts about coast redwoods, the tallest trees in the world

Melissa Breyer August 29, 2017 Sturdy, stalwart, and superlatively statuesque, California’s coast redwoods stand out as some of the most impressive organisms on the planet. Before the 1850s, coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) luxuriated amongst some 2 million acres of California’s coast, stretching from south of Big Sur to just over the Oregon border. One of three members of the Sequoioideae …

Is the Amazon vulnerable to a ‘dieback’?

Indigenous people say the rainfall has changed. And “the models, and they’re pretty consistent. They suggest that the combination of fire and climate change and deforestation will weaken the hydrological cycle of the Amazon to the point where you just get insufficient rainfall in the south and the east, and then part of the central Amazon, to actually support a …