Congestion tolling with mileage-based user fees or a VMT tax better for low income drivers

By Chet Edelman, September 17th, 2018 in News in SSTI, Tags: congestion pricing, equity, VMT fees,  Do mileage-based congestion fees hit low-income drivers harder? While there is mounting evidence that demand-based pricing—or congestion tolling—can more efficiently manage highway use, serious concerns continue to arise regarding the system’s disproportionate impacts on low-income drivers. However, a recent study by researchers at Purdue University has found that a less onerous tax alternative may exist—one that combines …

Two-thirds of the U.S. corporations that rake in the most federal tax dollars, either via contracts or subsidies, pay their CEOs more than 100 times what they pay their median workers

By Chuck Collins, Inequality This Week (Labor Day 2018) inequality@ips-dc.org At the Institute for Policy Studies, we’ve been worrying about the wild divide between how companies treat their CEOs and their workers for well over two decades now. My colleagues Sarah Anderson and Sam Pizzigati have just released our 25th annual Executive Excess report. The study’s key finding: Two-thirds of the …

Amazon gets huge subsidies to provide good jobs—but it’s a top employer of SNAP recipients in at least five states; One-third of Amazon employees in Arizona need food stamps to feed themselves.

By H. Claire Brown, New Food Economy and The Intercept, April 19th, 2018 The Intercept.  We wrote a supplemental story about food stamps in the food industry here.  Later this year, Amazon will begin accepting grocery orders from customers using the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the federal anti-poverty program formerly known as food stamps. As the nation’s largest e-commerce grocer, Amazon stands to …

How inequality creates the social and political divisions that isolate us from each other, eroding our mental health

By Kate Pickett, Richard Wilkinson on Common Dreams and OpenDemocracy.net, 14 Aug 2018 We’ve known for a long time that inequality causes a wide range of health and social problems, including everything from reduced life expectancy and higher infant mortality to poor educational attainment, lower social mobility and increased levels of violence.(Photo: Flickr/mSeattle. CC BY 2.0.) When people are asked what matters most for their …

The U.S. Spends Far Too Little on Social Welfare

By Nathaniel Lewis March 26, 2018 at the People’s Policy Project.  See how to directly support at the link below! Alexander Rabb / Flickr The US government has a spending problem. Given the country’s level of wealth, the government spends far too little — at least $1.6 trillion a year too little — on social welfare. This exacerbates problems like poverty and inequality, …

To Force Billionaires Off Welfare, Sanders Tax Would Make Corporations Fund 100% of Public Assistance Their Low-Paid Workers Receive

By Jake Johnson, Friday, August 24, 2018 by Common Dreams “I don’t believe that ordinary Americans should be subsidizing the wealthiest person in the world because you pay your employees inadequate wages.” “While Mr. Bezos is the most egregious example, the Walton family of Walmart and many other billionaire-owned large and profitable companies also enrich themselves off taxpayer assistance while paying their workers poverty-level wages,” …

Our Missing $10 Trillion: Tax cuts from the Bush, Obama, and Trump years have left a massive gap in the public coffers. This hurts everyone.

July 20, 2018 | Josh Hoxie Originally in OtherWords A trillion dollars, a figure with twelve zeros after a one, is by any measure a ton of money. It’s near impossible to comprehend how much a trillion is. So, it’s admittedly hard to comprehend a new report that tallies the combined tax cuts of the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations from the …

Just transition funds via a 1 percent charge on mega-retailers’ revenue from city sales, excluding groceries and medicine. Companies such as Wells Fargo, Apple, Comcast, and Banana Republic that make over $1 billion in revenue a year

By Kate Yoder on Jul 30, 2018, Grist.com, Should big corporations pay for clean energy? Portland voters will decide. Reverend E.D. Mondainé, president of the NAACP Portland Branch and chief petitioner of the Portland Clean Energy Fund. Rick Rappaport / Portland Clean Energy Fund A new ballot initiative in Portland would raise $30 million a year for clean energy through a tax on …

Stock Buybacks Starving the Economy: A new report finds that big companies could have given their workers thousands of dollars’ worth of raises with the money they spent on their own shares.

“How much might workers have benefited if companies had devoted their financial resources to them rather than to shareholders? Lowe’s, CVS, and Home Depot could have provided each of their workers a raise of $18,000 a year, the report found. Starbucks could have given each of its employees $7,000 a year, and McDonald’s could have given $4,000 to each of …

A growing number of people invest in real estate they never intend to occupy and push up prices for the rest of us. Cities should make them pay.

Municipalities should move quickly to enact high-end real estate transfer taxes, requirements for the disclosure of beneficial ownership, and regulations aimed at the disruptive impact absentee owner-investors are having on our cities. And cities should act in concert to keep from being pitted against each other, forming compacts to defend themselves against rapacious global capital. The city of Vancouver has …