What Do Companies Owe The Environment? Integrating Natural Capital in Risk Assessments: A Step-by-Step Guide

Excerpt from Clean Technica, What Do Companies Owe The Environment? Natural Capital Risk Assessment At Davos, January 16th, 2019 | by Carolyn Fortuna A week before the 2019 World Economic Forum in Davos, the Natural Capital Finance Alliance (NCFA) has launched the world’s first step-by-step guide to help financial institutions conduct a rapid natural capital risk assessment — “not just greenhouse gases, but also how …

Blueprint for a fairer Europe: “manifesto for the democratisation of Europe” says EU institutions are stuck in “a technocratic impasse” that benefits the rich.

The Guardian, Dec 10, 2018.   The budget would be worth 4% of the EU’s GDP – four times the current budget. Funds would be raised from four sources: an extra 15% levy on corporate profits, tax increases on individuals earning more than €100,000, a wealth tax on personal fortunes above €1m, and a tax on carbon emissions. The money would …

Optimizing Restoration Can Deliver an Eightfold Increase in Cost-Effectiveness

A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution presents a novel approach to identify optimal priority areas for restoration, considering multiple criteria such as biodiversity conservation, climate change mitigation and reduction of costs. In a context of multiple local, national and global targets for ecosystem restoration, the study presents a flexible tool capable of increasing restoration cost-effectiveness by up to eight …

Vacant lot rehab: Mowing-to-own in St. Louis. Installing trees and picket fences in Philly. How sweat equity and community engagement improves the economics of vacant-land reuse.

By James A. Anderson on Next City 2018 Cities across the U.S. Midwest and Rust Belt have long prayed for model citizens like St. Louisan Eltoreon Hawkins. Hawkins has drive: “My vision is to start on the block, in the neighborhood where I live,” he says. “I want to stabilize it. I see it as my chance to give back to …

Clothing from Ag fibers + Urban Gardening 101: How to Deal With Contaminated Soil

By Brian Barth, Modern Farmer, on EcoWatch Urban soils are particularly prone to contamination. Fifty years ago, your yard could have belonged to a farmer, who, perhaps not knowing any better, disposed of old bottles of anti-freeze or contaminated diesel in a hole out behind the tractor garage. Or perhaps the remains of a fallen down outbuilding, long ago coated …

Roots of Liberation

Reflection from Richard Rohr, Roots of Liberation, Sunday, June 24, 2018  One of the great themes of the Bible, beginning with the Hebrew Scriptures and continued by Jesus and Paul, is “the preferential option for the poor.” I call it “the bias toward the bottom.” The Hebrew people’s exodus out of slavery, and YHWH’s complete identification with them, is the pattern of …

Let’s use the right-of-way in a smarter way

Right-of-way farming joins a bevy of sustainable initiatives along the Ray C. Anderson Memorial Highway in Georgia. By Matt Hickman, 4 Dec 2017  The Ray, a 18-mile-long stretch of highway that’s trying its hardest to mitigate all the ill effects associated with highway travel, is getting a 1,000-square-foot demonstration wheat farm along its shoulder. (Photo: The Ray) Having a stretch …

Developing work and systems that distributive and generative from the start

Kate Raworth recognises that a dramatic new mindset is needed if we’re going to address the economic challenges of the 21st century. Her iconic book, Doughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist, argues that our economic activity should operate in a space that’s above a social foundation, and below an ecological ceiling. What this means in practice …

Research shows that every $1 invested in restoring degraded land generates an estimated $7–$30 in economic benefits

Be Helen Ding, Sofia Faruqi, Caroline Gagné and Andrés Anchondo Ortega – December 19, 2017 WRI   Costa Rica is a restoration success story. Photo by Aaron Minnick/WRI Trees are obviously good for the planet. What’s not so clear to most people—governments, NGOs, investors, the public—are their socioeconomic benefits. Trees are essential for the economy, our health and our wellbeing. , including improved food production, carbon sequestration, and …