Rural students are far less likely to go to college than their urban and suburban counterparts, and they’re less likely to finish once they start

“Rural students are far less likely to go to college than their urban and suburban counterparts, and they’re less likely to finish once they start.” NYT Mag (gift article for ND readers): The Tragedy of America’s Rural Schools. (If rural Americans and inner city Americans ever realized they were victims of the exact same systemic unfairness and got together to …

Senate Testimony: Concentration of economic and financial power is squeezing out pharmacies, jobs, and livelihoods in rural areas

“At the root of much of rural America’s distress is the concentration of economic and financial power,” ILSR Co-Director Stacy Mitchell testified before the U.S. Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday, April 20th. “We have a few superstar cities mostly on the coasts that are prospering. Meanwhile, much of rural America is falling further and further behind. Good jobs are rare. Poverty …

Is Free Public Transit an Idea Whose Time Has Come?

By SANDY SMITH, Next City, MAY 19, 2021 New York City’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is one of several large public-transit agencies contemplating a fare-free future. (Photo by Adjoajo/CC BY-SA 4.0) The debate over transportation equity has heated up, given the sharp change in transit-rider demographics once the COVID-19 pandemic took most whiter and wealthier riders off of buses and (especially) …

Fossil fuel risk bond programs underway in Oregon and Washington, now part of national legislation

Center for Sustainable Economy’s (CSE) work on fossil fuel risk bond programs (FFRB) – a signature ‘polluter pays’ project on fossil fuel infrastructure that was launched about 2 years ago — would provide a major deterrent for building new fossil fuel infrastructure as well as incentives to retire existing infrastructure early in any jurisdiction that adopts it.   2019 and 2020 brought …

Race is the factor that bears the strongest relationship to slow and ineffective enforcement of the federal drinking water law in US

A landmark 2007 study by academic Dr. Robert Bullard, the “father of environmental justice,” found “race to be more important than socioeconomic status in predicting the location of the nation’s commercial hazardous waste facilities.” Bullard helped elevate the issue in the United States as an important target for advocacy. The current Black Lives Matter movement, while largely focused on ending police brutality, …

How to reconnect urban and rural America. Also, education…

A Marshall Plan for Rural America, local journalism and local recovery, Launch a new development corporation, to invest in local vision and leadership through long-term block grants at the community level and innovative financing tools that give communities a fighting chance to strengthen and renew their local institutions, economies, and vision. Create a national rural strategy, elevate White House and interagency leadership, and undertake a set of specific and targeted …

Just recovery policies

Foundations for a Just Recovery Many of the policy solutions we advocate for a just recovery are cross-cutting by nature. They aim to shift mindsets, cultural norms, how people are treated, how our voices are heard, and how bedrock environmental laws are upheld, creating an overarching structure from which to fight for social, environmental, and economic justice. Honor those whose …

It’s Time for States to Invest in Infrastructure

Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, It’s Time for States to Invest in Infrastructure, updated March 19, 2019 by ELIZABETH MCNICHOL State investment in transportation, public buildings, water treatment systems, and other forms of vital infrastructure is key to creating good jobs and promoting full economic recovery. States should reject the flawed economic growth strategy of cutting taxes and offering …

US tidal wave of long-term unemployment as millions of people who lost jobs early in the pandemic remain out of work six months later and job losses increasingly turn permanent

By Jeanna Smialek, Ben Casselman and Gillian Friedman, NYTimes, Oct. 3, 2020 The United States economy is facing a tidal wave of long-term unemployment as millions of people who lost jobs early in the pandemic remain out of work six months later and job losses increasingly turn permanent. The Labor Department said on Friday that 2.4 million people had been out of work for 27 …

Low-Income Households Pay More for Energy, but Efficiency Can Help

With bans on utility shutoffs during the COVID-19 pandemic expiring, action is needed to ease the energy burdens of at-risk communities. By Ariel Drehobl, US News, Sept 30, 2020 How Energy Efficiency Can Help Those With Lower IncomesMore Energy efficiency and weatherization can help ease the burdens of millions of struggling families. PAY THE ELECTRIC BILL or the mortgage? Run the air …