Study of Antarctic sea ice collapse warns of potential 10-foot sea rise, with rate of ocean warming up 50% since 1991.

Study of Antarctic sea ice collapse warns of potential 10-foot sea rise, by Joe Romm, Climate Progress,  Jan 15, 2019 PACK ICE MELTING IN SPRING IN ANTARCTICA’S WEDDEL SEA. CREDIT: PLANET OBSERVER/UNIVERSAL IMAGES GROUP VIA GETTY IMAGES A stunning new study on Antarctic sea ice collapse greatly raises the risk of a 10-foot sea level rise this century if President Donald …

The 1.5C target is still physically possible and dependent on choices now. Immediate fossil fuel phaseout could arrest climate change. All new cars, energy etc. should use renewables and be emission free

Immediate fossil fuel phaseout could arrest climate change – study There is widespread coverage of a new study published in Nature Communications which concludes that “climate change could be kept in check if a phaseout of all fossil fuel infrastructure were to begin immediately”. The Guardian adds: “The study found that if all fossil fuel infrastructure – power plants, factories, vehicles, …

Antarctic Losing 6x as Much Ice as in the 80s, World’s Oceans Are Warming Faster, Studies Show, Fueling Storms and Sea Rise:  ‘Global warming is here, it has major consequences, and it’s going to be very, very difficult to get this under control,’ an author of a new report says

Even more: Compared to just last year, the Antarctic ice is melting 15 percent faster, with East Antarctica—previously found to be relatively stable from year to year—now losing 56 billion tons of ice per year. Eric Rignot told CNN that he had not expected ice in the eastern part of the continent to be melting at such an alarming rate. Wednesday, January 16, 2019 Common …

Gulf Stream current at its weakest in 1,600 years, studies show. AMOC weakening should be avoided at all costs say scientists

Gulf Stream current at its weakest in 1,600 years, studies show Warm current that has historically caused dramatic changes in climate is experiencing an unprecedented slowdown and may be less stable than thought – with potentially severe consequences Damian Carrington, The Guardian, Environment editor, Wed 11 Apr 2018  The warm Atlantic current linked to severe and abrupt changes in the climate in …

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second: Seas absorb 90% of climate change’s energy as new research reveals vast heating over past 150 years

Damian Carrington, Mon 7 Jan 2019  Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second: Seas absorb 90% of climate change’s energy as new research reveals vast heating over past 150 years, in The Guardian, 7 Jan 2019 A Guardian calculation found the average heating across that 150-year period was equivalent to about 1.5 Hiroshima-size atomic bombs per second. …

Warmer winters and more fresh water input from melting have shortened the duration of ocean convection in the last decade

  The temperature and salinity of seawater are key drivers for the global ocean circulation system. Warm and saline water transported poleward cools at the surface when it reaches high latitudes and becomes denser and subsequently sinks into the deep ocean. This process is called convection. At depth, the water is circulated back towards the equator drawing new water masses …

Water stress, soil, and oceans at risk

About 40 percent of the world’s food depends on irrigation, which draws largely from stores of underground water, called aquifers, which make up 30 percent of the world’s freshwater. Unfortunately, groundwater is being rapidly depleted worldwide. In the United States, the Ogallala Aquifer—one of the world’s largest underground bodies of water—spans eight states in the High Plains and supplies almost …

It takes just 4 years to detect human-induced ocean warming

Excerpt from the Guardian.com, Sept 2017 Global ocean heat content data isn’t as noisy as land-based and surface temperatures.  It represents the total thermal energy in the ocean waters, and is now known with a high degree of certainty (see the figure below), in part because scientists have improved ocean temperature sensing methods and increased the number of sensors throughout …