Coordinate a synchronised movement: Flocking behavior in groups

Open.coop May 2019: Defining Collaboration DNA As we mentioned in a previous post on the murmurations of a collaborative sustainable economy, the basic models of flocking behaviour are controlled by three simple rules: Cohesion – steer towards average position of neighbours Separation – avoid crowding neighbours Alignment – steer towards average heading of neighbours There is nothing saying that the rules of a collaborative, …

Blindness of Experts and the Need for Democracy: Credentialed authorities are comically bad at predicting the future. But reliable forecasting is possible.

When an outcome took them by surprise, broad-minded specialists were much more likely to adjust their ideas. The best forecasters view their own ideas as hypotheses in need of testing. If they make a bet and lose, they embrace the logic of a loss just as they would the reinforcement of a win. This is called, in a word, learning.   …

How to grow distributed leadership

You use archetypes or personas to describe different types of leadership which have their corresponding shadow aspects. How can people become aware of their shadow aspects and make the most of them in group situations? One of the chapters I wrote in the book describes a leadership development framework I created called Full Circle Leadership. In my work at Enspiral, …

You Need to Practice Being Your Future Self

Harvard Business Review, You Need to Practice Being Your Future Self …the reason Sanjay is stuck — and the reason many of us feel that way — is that we focus on what’s present for us at any particular moment. On the other hand, what most of us want most is to move forward. And, by definition, paying attention to the present …

Two Things to Do After Every Meeting: Use the momentum built in productive meetings to generate action and real results afterwards

From Harvard Business Review by Paul Axtell At the end of each topic in a meeting, pause to agree on next steps and establish specific commitments with clear deadlines. Let people know they can negotiate at the time they make the commitments, especially with regard to due dates.  Don’t use the automatic “by the next meeting” as the due date. Be thoughtful about what …

How to reduce digital distractions: advice from medieval monks

Jamie Kreiner is associate professor of history at the University of Georgia. She is the author of The Social Life of Hagiography in the Merovingian Kingdom (2014) and her latest book, Legions of Pigs in the Early Medieval West, is forthcoming in 2020. She lives in Athens, GA. Edited by Sam Haselby in Aeon Easily distracted; from the Sloane Manuscript 2435, f. 44v. Courtesy the British Library …

How to Beat Procrastination (Backed by Science)

From Darius Foroux, in Pocket, April 2019 There comes a moment between the start and end of a task—I call it the slope of procrastination—when you give into one distraction. And that’s exactly the moment you give up being productive.  You start working on a task, you’re excited, you’re focused, but then, after some time, you think: Let’s read the news for a …

The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work (And How to Fix Them)

By James Clear May 23, 2016 One of the hardest things in life is to know when to keep going and when to move on. On the one hand, perseverance and grit are key to achieving success in any field. Anyone who masters their craft will face moments of doubt and somehow find the inner resolve to keep going. If you want to build …

Create a strong culture and organization

1. Create a Strong Culture – a shared way of doing something with passion What you celebrate, who you hire, transparency.  If you are aligned at a high level, if everyone believes in the mission and everyone has really good access to information, then that gets you a huge amount of the way there in terms of working productively together.  What …

Co-ops Need Leaders, Too 

Co-ops Need Leaders, Too by Nathan Schneider Originally posted on Medium on 21st January 2019. I frequently encounter a notion, among those drawn to cooperatives, that a cooperative should be an amorphous, faceless collective in which old-world skills and norms of leadership can be discarded. How does this work out for them? Not well. Usually one of two entirely predictable things happens as …