Wildfires on tundra burn off protective layer, contribute to permafrost thaw and carbon release from formerly frozen soils and peatlands

Wildfires on Arctic tundra can contribute to widespread permafrost thaw much like blazes in forested areas, according to a study published in the most recent issue of the online journal Scientific Reports.  The project, led by the U.S. Geological Survey, examined the effects of the massive Anaktuvuk River fire, which burned roughly 1,000 square kilometers of tundra on Alaska’s North Slope …

Single mine rivals coal emissions of whole countries, plus job and economic benefits much lower than promised and environmental costs much higher

The Carmichael coal mine in Australia will emit 79 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent a year — more than the annual emissions from Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, and about equal to the average annual emissions from both Malaysia and Austria. The projects will also emit three times as much carbon dioxide equivalent per year as the city of …

New Obama policy that energy, mining, and other development projects on America’s public lands should result in a net benefit — or at minimum no net loss — for the nation’s rivers, lands, and wildlife resources

  In what is being hailed as a “landmark” conservation policy, President Obama on Tuesday released a presidential memorandum establishing that energy, mining, and other development projects on America’s public lands should result in a net benefit — or at minimum no net loss — for the nation’s rivers, lands, and wildlife resources. “We all have a moral obligation to …

More Jobs and Economic Growth and Lower Energy Bills with Shift to 50-60% Renewables by 2030. Even better as we shift to over 80% by 2050!

Climate change is our nation’s greatest challenge—left unaddressed, it will have devastating impacts on our economy, our environment, and our communities and families. The good news is that addressing this challenge presents a tremendous opportunity to grow our economy and increase our shared prosperity. Today, NextGen Climate America released a new economic analysis based on data from E3’s Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in …

Carbon in Atmosphere Still Rising Fast – Earth Passing Thresholds

Climate change is set to pass the milestone of 1C of warming since pre-industrial times by the end of 2015, representing “uncharted territory” according to scientists at the UK’s Met Office. 2015 is also set to be the hottest on record, as the temperatures are so far beating past records “by a country mile”, they said. The World Meteorological (Met) …

A $4.8tr opportunity not yet grasped – steps for banks to protect clients from climate change risks, tap historic dividend

Cross-posted from Business Green, by Lauren Compere, Boston Common Asset Management on 30 Oct 2015 The build-up to a new international climate agreement has seen 55 countries specify the amount of funding they require to deliver the mitigation and adaptation projects needed to keep global warming below 2°C.  This totals $4.8tr, more than the entire GDP of Japan or Germany, and represents …

Demand for Cooling is Rising Fast

The world faces a looming and potentially calamitous “cold crunch”, with demand for air conditioning and refrigeration growing so fast that it threatens to smash pledges and targets for global warming.  From The Guardian UK. Worldwide power consumption for air conditioning alone is forecast to surge 33-fold by 2100 as developing world incomes rise and urbanisation advances. Already, the US …

Morgan Stanley’s Longstanding Financing Relationships with Worst Offenders from Coal-mining Industry Challenged

Morgan Stanley is the next major investment bank being targeted with a public campaign to demand that the bank commit to stop financing coal mining and coal-fired power.  “Morgan Stanley has longstanding financing relationships with some of the worst offenders from the global coal mining industry, including Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private sector coal mining company,” said Ben Collins, …

Cost of Permafrost Melting conservatively estimated at $43 Trillion over the next two centuries

Re-posted from The Washington Post.  To read the full article, go to this link. Scientists estimate that Arctic permafrost could contain 1,700 gigatons (which is equal to 1.7 trillion tons) of carbon. The release of some of this carbon, even gradually, could have dramatic consequences for the climate, leading to an acceleration in global climate change, more warming in the Arctic, and …