On a 100-year timescale, dams produce more methane than rice plantations & biomass burning, + push people off land and livelihood

Impact of dams on climate change has been underestimated, researchers warn, as rotting vegetation creates 25% more methane than previously thought The Guardian, 24 March 2017 Hydroelectric dams contribute more to global warming than previously estimated, according to a study published in BioScience. It appears that the current and planned boom of hydroelectric projects would double the current cover of …

Agriculture begins to tackle its role in climate change

After years of being off the table in climate talks, agriculture is now being considered widely by countries trying to reach their Paris emissions cuts pledges. By Georgina Gustin, Inside Climate News 4 Jan 2017 Farming in places like drought-plagued California is clearly impacted by climate change, but it can also play a role in slowing global warming, many countries …

More on how storms, precipitation intensity will increase with temperature

Excerpt, Science Daily, March 2017 The relationship between precipitation and temperature is founded in science. Simply put, warmer air holds more moisture. Scientists can even tell you how much. A widely used theorem in climate science called the Clausius-Clapeyron equation dictates that for every degree the temperature goes up, there is an approximately 7 percent increase in the amount of …

Climate science – it’s a lot older than you think!

The field of climate science stretches back almost 200 years. That’s right: scientists have been studying our planet for that long.  Read down to learn more! One of the biggest myths about climate science – a myth that has been deliberately fostered, for decades — is that we just don’t know that much, yet.  The field is still in its …

Climate Conference with Justice Action Mobilization Network in NYC, March 10-11

This event is Presented By: Tisch School of the Arts, in association with Hip Hop Caucus and Justice Action Mobilization Network The Climate Action Conference will bring together diverse stakeholders on climate at a critically important time within our new political reality in America. Through the conference we intend to jump start new strategies for collaboration and communicating about climate …

The World’s Oceans Are Losing Oxygen. Here’s Why That’s a Big Problem

By Melissa Chan, Originally published in Time Magazine, 17 Feb 2017 Coral reef in Seychelles that is degraded due to global warming.  RainervonBrandis—Getty Images Oceans across the globe are slowly losing oxygen, which poses a major problem for every living marine animal and underscores the serious consequences of climate change, researchers say. A new Nature study published this week found …

AI: Replacing managers with automated decision-making saves time and eliminates emotional volatility says world’s largest hedge fund

Bridgewater Associates has a team of engineers working on a project to automate decision-making to save time and eliminate human emotional volatility. See article in The Guardian, below.   This has an interesting connection to the weather and also air pollution.  The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review and medical researchers had already previous reported that air pollution from fossil fuel …

New study finds that higher temps in the Southwest since 2000 (1.6 F higher than average) is responsible for 1/6 to half of river flow reductions since 2000

New study found that the higher temperatures in the region since 2000 (1.6° Fahrenheit higher than the average since record-keeping there began) are responsible for between one-sixth to one-half of the river flow reductions seen since 2000.  By James Ayre, cross-posted from Clean Technica, 23 Feb 2017 The warming trend that has accompanied anthropogenic climate change to date has reduced …

Driving Fee Rolls Back Asthma Attacks in Stockholm

Study estimates that without new “congestion pricing” policy, kids would have suffered 45 percent more asthma attacks.  Cross-posted from Inside Science.  By Nala Rogers, 2 Feb 2017 Stockholm, Shutterstock (Inside Science) — Most people weren’t worried about air pollution in Stockholm, Sweden in 2006, according to Emilia Simeonova, an economist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. The city already had …