Declining precipitation in Colorado River Basin worsened by rising temperatures

Scientists found that another factor affected the runoff ratio: temperature. Over the last few centuries, the runoff ratio was reduced when temperatures were warmer. And the influence of temperature strengthened during drier years: When the snowpack was shallow, warm temperatures reduced the runoff ratio more than when the snowpack was deep, further exacerbating drought conditions. The low runoff ratios seen …

Significant increase in hospital admissions for mental illnesses seen during periods of heatwaves, especially during longer periods of heat exposure

A mental hospital-based study in Hanoi, Vietnam looked at if there is a relationship between heat exposure and mental health problems. The results showed significant increase in hospital admissions for mental illnesses during periods of heatwaves, especially during longer periods of heat exposure. This is according to a doctoral thesis from Umeå University. The study, which looked at admissions data …

New study finds that higher temps in the Southwest since 2000 (1.6 F higher than average) is responsible for 1/6 to half of river flow reductions since 2000

New study found that the higher temperatures in the region since 2000 (1.6° Fahrenheit higher than the average since record-keeping there began) are responsible for between one-sixth to one-half of the river flow reductions seen since 2000.  By James Ayre, cross-posted from Clean Technica, 23 Feb 2017 The warming trend that has accompanied anthropogenic climate change to date has reduced …

Heat has demonstrable effects on performance and productivity

Excerpted from Nick Kristoff, NYTimes A new working paper by Jisung Park, a Ph.D. student in economics at Harvard, compared the performances of New York City students on 4.6 million exams with the day’s temperature. He found that students taking a New York State Regents exam on a 90-degree day have a 12 percent greater chance of failing than when …

2 critical climate change problems most people don’t know about

By Zachary Shahan, cross-posted from Clean Technica, August 23rd, 2016 Global warming and climate change get a lot of attention — well, not in the mainstream media, but among niche media outlets like CleanTechnica. However, whether in the mainstream media or in niche publications, some of the big challenges of a quickly changing climate are not often highlighted, and I’m quite confident …

PNAS findings: increasing temperatures hurt tree growth. Rising temps remove water from both soil and atmosphere.

By Brittany Patterson, ClimateWire and Scientific American on August 10, 2016 Just as the planet is being taxed from record-breaking temperatures, new research finds iconic Douglas firs across the West are water- and heat-stressed. Similar to the humans who find themselves sluggish during a heat wave, when water is scarce, Douglas firs also put the brakes on growing — a choice …

With the searing heat, many have barely left home in daylight hours since June in the Middle East

By  Hugh Naylor 10 August 2016, cross-posted from The Washington Post Parts of the United Arab Emirates and Iran experienced a heat index — a measurement that factors in humidity as well as temperature — that soared to 140 degrees in July, and Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, recorded an all-time high temperature of nearly 126 degrees. Southern Morocco’s relatively cooler climate suddenly sizzled last month, …