Just how much more land, water, air and climate saving are Impossible Burgers?

Brown’s vision for Impossible Foods is so much grander than simply making a meat substitute. In the company’s Sustainability Report from 2017 they write: “Americans consume about 10 billion pounds of ground beef per year. The average American eats three hamburgers every week— nearly 50 billion burgers per year and about half of this is consumed in restaurants. In order to supply …

Food waste is so rampant in the US that an estimated 40 percent of the entire country’s food never makes it to the plate.

Oct. 15, 2018 Should We Just Ban ‘Best By’ Labels on Food?  By Dan Nosowitz, initially posted in Modern Farmer. Tesco, one of the UK’s biggest supermarket chains, announced this week that it will remove “best by” date labels from 116 fruit and vegetable items. The move builds on a smaller reduction in the label earlier this year. So why are those labels bad? …

We’re in a new age of obesity. How did it happen? You’d be surprised. It’s not that we’re eating more, that we exercise less, or that we lack willpower.

By George Monbiot in the Guardian.  The shaming of overweight people has to stop Wed 15 Aug   Illustration by Nicola Jennings When I saw the photograph I could scarcely believe it was the same country. A picture of Brighton beach in 1976, featured in the Guardian a few weeks ago, appeared to show an alien race. Almost everyone was slim. I mentioned it on social media, …

Why Ravaging Heatwaves Matter to World’s Dinner Table

By Agnieszka De Sousa August 14, 2018, 12:12 AM MDT To see the impact of record-breaking temperatures around the world, watch wheat. Found in everything from bread to noodles, biscuits to cereals, beer to cakes — there is no more widely grown staple crop and more than 170 million metric tons trade every year. So when the weather ruins harvests in …

This Summer’s Heat Waves Could Be the Strongest Climate Signal Yet: ‘In many places, people are preparing for the past or present climate. But this summer is the future

By Bob Berwyn, Inside Climate News, 28 July 2018 Extreme heat killed more than 80 people in Japan in July, just a few weeks after flooding from downpours was blamed for more than 200 deaths there. Martin Bureau/Getty Images Earth’s global warming fever spiked to deadly new highs across the Northern Hemisphere this summer, and we’re feeling the results—extreme heat …

Sinking land, poisoned water: the dark side of California’s mega farms

The floor of the Central Valley is slumping, and there is arsenic in the tap water. Now it seems the two problems are connected.  By Alissa Greenberg in Lanare, California, for The Guardian, Wed 18 Jul 2018    Farm fields along the path of the California aqueduct in the Central Valley, a region that produces a quarter of the nation’s food. Photograph: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters …

Global food production is sufficient to meet human nutritional needs in 2050 provided there is radical societal adaptation

Current crop yields could provide nutritious food for the projected 2050 global population, but only if we make radical changes to our dietary choices, a new study shows. Researchers from Lancaster University have analysed global and regional food supplies to reveal the flows of calories, protein and vital micro-nutrients from production through to human consumption, in a study published in Elementa, …

Transforming Your Lawn With Edible Landscaping

July 8th, 2018 Originally published on The Climate Reality Project. Edible landscaping can go a long way toward conserving valuable resources while creating a powerful carbon sink, allowing you to take effective climate action right in your own backyard. What have you done for me lately? The one-and-only Janet Jackson once asked that question of a bad boyfriend. But lately, we’ve been …

What if School Lunch Programs Promoted Public Health, Good Jobs, and the Environment? From LA to Cook County, local governments are using their purchasing power to transform the food system.

By Anna Lappé and Jose Oliva in The Nation, 25 May 2018 Students eat lunch at the cafeteria at Marston Middle School in San Diego, California, March 7, 2011. (Reuters / Mike Blake) Eleven billion dollars. That’s the total tally of the national school-food program in the United States and just a small fraction of what public institutions in this country spend every year in …