Worst Case Effects of Hurricanes, Flooding, High Tides, and Sea Level Rise on DelDOT Assets

Delaware DOT and the University of Delaware, 2017 Draft Objectives What are the worst case effects of hurricanes, riverine flooding, high tides, and sea level rise inundation on DelDOT’s assets? The University of Delaware Water Resources Center (UDWRC) and Center for Applied Demography and Survey Research (CADSR) utilized climatic, hydrologic, hydraulic, and geographic information systems (GIS) data to document and …

Storms bringing extra rain with climate change and breakdown of polar vortex can lead to temperature lows

This year’s intense Atlantic storm season had another element tying its biggest events together: a monstrous, and sometimes deadly, amount of rain. Images of the flooded metropolises of Houston, Jacksonville, and San Juan with overtopped dams, billowing sewage, and flooded homes show that torrential rain can be one of the most devastating consequences of hurricanes, especially in urban areas where concrete makes …

“How are we going to pay for this?” agencies ask re: climate change costs?

Whether it is 4½ feet of sea level rise by 2100 that would leave more than 75,000 people in San Francisco and Alameda County vulnerable to inundation, and threaten $100 billion worth of existing property along the California coast… Or 137 large wildfires raging across 7.8 million acres in what might be the worst fire season ever Agencies are asking, …

Toxic Emissions From 46 Petrochemical Sites, Flooding At 14 Toxic Waste Sites, & ~100 Hazardous Substance Spills — Hurricane Harvey’s Talley To Date

September 11th, 2017 by James Ayre on Clean Technica Now that a bit of time has elapsed since Hurricane Harvey tore a path of destruction along the coast of Texas, things have begun to get clearer as regards the fate of Houston’s many petrochemical facilities. The tally on that count, as it stands right now, is: flooding and/or damage reported at 14 toxic …

New research finds that most previous estimates for sea level rise were too conservative, while visualizations show what U.S. cities may look like by 2100

 On Common Dreams, by Nika Knight, April 2017  President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort would be completely drowned in the most extreme scenario for sea level rise. (Image: Climate Central) A new report shows that many previous estimates of global sea level rise by 2100 were far too conservative, the Washington Post reported Thursday, and the research comes as new maps and …