Energy footprints grow with expenditure: the top 10% consume roughly 20 times more energy than the bottom 10%

A study published in Nature Energy shows that energy footprints grow with expenditure, and, as a consequence, are unequally distributed. Among all the countries and income classes in the study, the top 10% consume roughly 20 times more energy than the bottom 10%. Additionally, as income increases, people spend more of their money on energy-intensive goods, such as package holidays or …

As e-bike users discover how much further they can travel in a given amount of time, they start using their bikes more and their cars less

StreetsBlog, Sept 2020 Cycling Industry News reports on a study in Norway that finds that as e-bike users discover how much further they can travel in a given amount of time, they start using their bikes more and their cars less. The study of Oslo bicyclists found that e-bike users were traveling 340 percent further on average than they were on their …

As natural gas bans go national, can cities fill the gap? Regulators need to examine how to wind down utilities’ gas businesses

Fossil fuels burned in residential and commercial buildings contributed to 28,200 premature deaths in the U.S. in 2018, according to a February study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that was published in the journal Nature (E&E News PM, Feb. 12) David Iaconangelo, E&E News reporterPublished: Monday, August 3, 2020 Building electrification strategies are gaining strength nationally to improve efficiency and cut …

Battery Powered Trains will be 35% Cheaper Than Hydrogen, Study Concludes: Plus the price of batteries keeps dropping

Oliver Cuenca of International Railway Journal reports that the battery-powered trains cost 35% less to buy and operate than hydrogen trains. The batteries don’t have to be replaced as often as fuel cells, either, so maintenance costs will be lower. If the trains operate during the daytime, they can be charged at night with the same cheap electricity, just like people …

Deliberate decline focuses on the deep shifts in established systems that are necessary to realize decarbonization

Daniel Rosenbloom and Adrian Rinscheid, 26 July 2020 https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.669 Promoting low‐carbon innovation has long been a central preoccupation within both the practice and theory of climate change mitigation. However, deep lock‐ins indicate that existing carbon‐intensive systems will not be displaced or reconfigured by innovation alone. A growing number of studies and practical initiatives suggest that mitigation efforts will need to engage …

Electricity, cars, and buildings make up close to two-thirds of US emissions. We can drive fossil fuels out of the US economy, quickly by electrifying everything

In a nutshell, he has shown that it’s possible to eliminate 70 percent to 80 percent of US carbon emissions by 2035 through rapid deployment of existing electrification technologies, with little-to-no carbon capture and sequestration. Doing so would slash US energy demand by around half, save consumers money, and keep the country on a 1.5° pathway without requiring particular behavior …

Regulatory Solutions for Building Decarbonization: Tools for Commissions and Other Government Agencies

Regulatory Solutions for Building Decarbonization: Tools for Commissions and Other Government Agencies + NEAT Tool in LA at the bottom 2020  |  By  Sherri Billimoria and Mike Henchen DOWNLOAD To meet the imperative of curbing climate change and restoring clean and healthy air to our communities, it is critical that policymakers act to eliminate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the building sector. …

Freedom from coal: Coal was the fuel for more than half of US electricity as recently as 2003, but was down to less than 25 percent last year and is some of most expensive to operate now

Excerpt from Inside Climate News We don’t need coal and it’s cheaper to get rid of it. Coal was the fuel for more than half of the country’s electricity as recently as 2003, but was down to less than 25 percent last year. And coal’s decline is accelerating, with many coal-fired power plants sitting idle during the coronavirus crisis because those plants are …

Massachusetts may become just the third state, after California and New York, to begin planning for a managed decline of its conventional natural gas industry and gas in new buildings

According to the petition, the DPU should examine the investment needed to ensure a safe and reliable gas system over the next 30 years, while gas demand declines. The AG’s Office also urges the DPU to examine whether there are other cost-effective alternatives to traditional gas infrastructure investment that may be better aligned with the state’s climate goals. The AG’s …

Home heating is largest use of fossil fuel in buildings, which are the largest source of GHGs in urban areas: It’s time to incentivize residential heat pumps. 5 to 8 million buildings add or replace heating equipment each year

5 to 8 million US buildings will add or replace heating equipment each year. Each one of these decisions may lock in fossil fuel use in buildings for decades since gas furnaces have a 15- to 20-year lifetime. June 8, 2020  |  By RMI. Claire McKenna, Amar Shah, Mark Silberg The United States has made significant progress decarbonizing the electricity sector in recent …