Ranchers in Divide County, North Dakota, rely on the rain. Last year the rains and crops failed, and the temperature shot up, but Did It Change Minds on Climate Change?

July 17, 2018, By Meera Subramanian, Inside Climate News DIVIDE COUNTY, North Dakota — I walk in the front door of Byron Carter’s house as others are entering in the back, and Koda the dog can’t decide which way to direct her barking. I’m in Divide County, North Dakota, but borders seem a little meaningless here. Last summer’s drought, which was calamitous for …

Roots of Prosperity: The Economics and Finance of Restoring Land

by Helen Ding, Sofia Faruqi, Andrew Wu, Juan-Carlos Altamirano, Andrés Anchondo Ortega, René Zamora Cristaless This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the benefits and costs of restoring forests and landscapes in countries around the world, demonstrating how smart policies and innovative financing can help governments meet their restoration targets. The authors find that finance, both public and private, for restoration is inadequate for seven reasons, …

Surviving drought: Herbivores help protect ecosystems from climate change

Plant-eating critters are the key ingredient to helping ecosystems survive global warming, finds new UBC research that offers some hope for a defence strategy against climate change. “The herbivores created space for other plants and animals to move in and we saw much more diversity and variety in these ecosystems,” said Rebecca Kordas, the lead author of the study who …

Reduced rainfall in the SW through late summer and fall, and in the longterm, due to climate disruption

ScienceDaily 18 Oct 2017 excerpt …Results highlight the possibility of a strong precipitation reduction in the northern edge of the monsoon in the southwestern US in response to warming, with consequences for regional water resources, agriculture and ecosystems. “Monsoon rains are critical for the southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico, yet the fate of the North American monsoon is quite uncertain,” …

Increasing droughts, lower crop yields (just 40% already in Utah and forecast to go to 10%), and increased stress and conflict

A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change’s impact on irrigation. The most adversely affected region, according to the researchers, will be the Southwest. Already a water-stressed part of the country, this region is projected to experience …