Massive storms and Western Atlantic sea level rise resulted from slightly warmer temperatures and moderate CO2 concentrations over a hundred thousand years ago

Geologic evidence is the forerunner of ominous prospects for a warming Earth, October 12, 2017, Science Daily While strong seasonal hurricanes have devastated many of the Caribbean and Bahamian islands this year, geologic studies on several of these islands illustrate that more extreme conditions existed in the past. A new analysis shows that the limestone islands of the Bahamas and …

Economic impacts, job losses with hurricanes

As Economic Policy Institute Senior Economist Elise Gould wrote, the drop-off in unemployment “was almost certainly due to Hurricane Irma, which struck smack in the middle of the reference period, and the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.” Over the phone, she told The Intercept that the storms had “a larger effect than I would have expected.” While drawing direct correlations between warming …

One quarter of the US driving population might be better off using ride services rather than owning a car

Up to one-quarter of all U.S. drivers might be better off using ride-sharing services instead. SHARE from CityLab Every day there’s more news about the inevitable arrival of autonomous vehicles. At the same time, more people are using ride-hailing and ride-sharing apps, and the percentage of teens getting their driver’s license continues to decline. Given these technologies and social changes, it’s worth asking: Should Americans stop …

Costs of climate change: increasingly severe storms, more days of Convective Available Potential Energy in the tropics and subtropics

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, by Martin Singh, October 2017 Thunderstorms represent the dramatic release of energy stored in the atmosphere. One measure of this stored energy is called “convective available potential energy”, or CAPE. The higher the CAPE, the more energy is available to power updrafts in clouds. Fast updrafts move ice particles in the cold, upper regions …

Needing to price resilience

Excerpt from Too often electric resilience — the ability to withstand or bounce back from an outage — is an intangible in the minds of energy users, he said. They don’t consider the cost of downtime, even though power outages create clear financial losses that can be quantified – and that microgrids can avert. For example, a supermarket may lose hundreds …

A closer look at carbon taxes in/for the U.S. and Canada and what could work

An essay on the subject by Mark Jaccard of Simon Fraser University on Policy Options: When asked which climate policy in Canada reduced the most CO2 emissions over the last decade, many people guess BC’s well-publicized carbon tax. They’re wrong. It was Ontario’s ban on coal-fired power, which reduced annual emissions by 25 megatonnes (MT). Surely, then, BC’s carbon tax must have …

Car sharing increases mobility, decreases greenhouse gas emissions

July 20, 2016, phys.org Credit: University of California – Berkeley Drive, ride or share? It’s a question more people are asking themselves as transportation options are rapidly evolving. But what does it mean for road congestion and the environment? In the first-ever North American one-way carsharing impact study, the Transportation Sustainability Research Center (TSRC) reveals that car2go has a substantive …

Hurricane Damages Will Hit U.S. Taxpayers Hard: Government watchdogs have been warning about the financial risks of climate change, from extreme storms to wildfires, and their impact on the U.S. budget

By Georgina Gustin, Inside Climate News, 11 Sep 2017 First Harvey, then Irma, and the hurricane season isn’t over. This is the year that repeated, dire predictions about the fiscal risks of climate change—its increasingly heavy burden on the federal budget—are coming true. The hurricanes’ successive blows may cost taxpayers more than they spent on relief and recovery in any previous …

Big Oil must pay for climate change. Now we can calculate how much

By Peter C Frumhoff and Myles Allen, 7 Sept 2017 in The Guardian As communities in coastal Texas and Louisiana confront the damage wrought by Hurricane Harvey, another hurricane, Irma, fueled by abnormally warm waters, is barreling into the Caribbean and threatening Puerto Rico and Florida. We know that the costs of both hurricanes will be enormous and that climate change will have made …