Our average electricity in the US is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour, whereas new low prices for utility-scale renewables are 2.91 cents per kWh

By Joe Romm, April 6, 2017.  Stunning drops in solar and wind costs turn global power market upside down:  The world built more renewables for far less money last year, report UN and Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Last year, solar in Chile set a record low global price for unsubsidized electricity by any technology. CREDIT: ACERA. Stunning drops in the cost of wind …

Inequality and economics: Tony Atkinson’s enduring lessons

By Andrea Brandolini, Bank of Italy2 LIS Newsletter, Issue No. 1 (March 2017) – Inequality Matters  Tony Atkinson died of multiple myeloma in January 2017. Developing an idea originated by Hugh Dalton (1920), Tony viewed income inequality as the loss of social welfare associated with an uneven distribution of incomes. This focus on social welfare allowed him to derive three important …

Who should own and benefit from our country’s infrastructure?

Who should own and benefit from our country’s infrastructure? What is really being lost here is the public interest. Infrastructure should primarily serve public needs, not generate profits for enterprises owned and controlled by companies that care far more about their own bottom lines than the common good. That’s not to say that private interests can never build roads or bridges …

MnDOT measures financial return on taxpayers’ investment in biking infrastructure

Cycling in Minnesota creates thousands of jobs and cuts health-care spending, state report concludes By Josephine Marcotty, Star Tribune, 28 March 2017 . For many Minnesotans cycling is nothing more than a Sunday frolic, but a new report finds that the state’s bike industry produces $780 million in annual economic activity, 5,519 jobs and millions of dollars in health care savings …

Heede and the Climate Accountability Institute detail emissions of the Carbon Majors

The Climate Accountability Institute (CAI), in collaboration with CDP (London), announces the publication of operational and product-use emissions attributed to fifty major oil and gas companies over the period from 1988 to 2015.Press Release: Carbon Majors 2015 update: six companies responsible for one-third of emissions from oil and gas sector since 1988. The Climate Accountability Institute and CDP jointly announce the publication …

Huge public savings in store as states move toward “transportation electrification”

Expanded Use Of EVs in CT, MA, MD, NY & PA Could Yield “Multi-Billions” In Savings & Benefits   From Massachusetts and New York to California, state governments are embracing plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and are setting—and achieving—goals to put PEVs on the road and removing petroleum-burning cars and trucks. States are finding that they can realize big benefits from …

Electric cars and cheap solar ‘could halt fossil fuel growth by 2020’

The Guardian, 17 Feb 2017:  Solar power and clean cars are ‘gamechangers’ consistently underestimated by big energy, says Imperial College and Carbon Tracker report  By 2035, electric vehicles could make up 35% of the road transport market, and two-thirds by 2050. Photograph: Miles Willis/Getty Images for Go Ultra Low Falling costs of electric vehicles and solar panels could halt worldwide …

New study finds that higher temps in the Southwest since 2000 (1.6 F higher than average) is responsible for 1/6 to half of river flow reductions since 2000

New study found that the higher temperatures in the region since 2000 (1.6° Fahrenheit higher than the average since record-keeping there began) are responsible for between one-sixth to one-half of the river flow reductions seen since 2000.  By James Ayre, cross-posted from Clean Technica, 23 Feb 2017 The warming trend that has accompanied anthropogenic climate change to date has reduced …

Driving Fee Rolls Back Asthma Attacks in Stockholm

Study estimates that without new “congestion pricing” policy, kids would have suffered 45 percent more asthma attacks.  Cross-posted from Inside Science.  By Nala Rogers, 2 Feb 2017 Stockholm, Shutterstock (Inside Science) — Most people weren’t worried about air pollution in Stockholm, Sweden in 2006, according to Emilia Simeonova, an economist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. The city already had …