Leading for Well-being: it’s time to become leaders ourselves! To dream (and organize) bigger: to address climate change and inequality on a deeper, structural level

By L. Hunter Lovins, Spring 2017.  It’s time to become leaders ourselves, to dream (and organize) bigger: to address climate change and inequality on a deeper, structural level. It’s time to re-think work and security and the value of life. To reject blind pursuit of growth. It is time to build an economy that provides well-being to all—people and species—rather than …

The “big hush” and other maps showing what Americans really think about climate and the transition before us

New York Times, 21 March 2017, excerpt by Nadja Popovich, John Schwartz, and Tatiana Schlossberg Americans overwhelmingly believe that global warming is happening, and that carbon emissions should be scaled back. But fewer are sure that the changes will harm them personally. New data released by the Yale Program on Climate Communication gives the most detailed view yet of public opinion …

Talk about the weather

By HIROKO TABUCHI 28 Jan 2017, New York Times GLEN ELDER, Kan. — Doug Palen, a fourth-generation grain farmer on Kansas’ wind-swept plains, is in the business of understanding the climate. Since 2012, he has choked through the harshest drought to hit the Great Plains in a century, punctuated by freakish snowstorms and suffocating gales of dust. His planting season starts …

Green State America:  a coalition to keep America’s climate promises and hold to other values?

By FRANK ACKERMAN, from the forthcoming January/February 2017 issue of Dollars and Sense In January, Donald Trump will endorse climate denial, renouncing the Clean Power Plan and climate targets in general. This will damage the fragile global momentum toward emission reduction, established in last year’s Paris agreement. If the United States refuses to cooperate, why should much poorer, reluctant participants such as …

Trying to put a price on fossil fuel industry’s obstruction of climate change policy

ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch/Shell, and three oil-industry groups together spend $115 million a year on advocacy designed to “obstruct” climate change policy, according to new estimates released by Influence Map, a British nonprofit research organization. The sheer fuzziness of corporate influence prompted the project. Nations hold companies to different standards—or none at all—for disclosures of how they are trying to influence public policy …

Young Conservatives for Clean Energy Reform say instead of fighting over climate change, we can all rally around freedom, national security, and clean energy jobs

Angel Garcia, of Young Conservatives for Energy Reform, is working to persuade Republicans about the need for renewable energy. In an interview with Diane Toomey at Yale360, he explains why his group avoids mentioning climate change when it makes its pitch to conservatives Young Conservatives for Energy Reform was formed in 2012 to promote a green energy agenda for Republicans. …