7 reasons to be alarmed by record-setting levels of CO2

By Joe Romm, Climate Progress, June 2017:  Trump puts humanity back on track to CO2 levels not seen since it was 5° to 10°F warmer and seas were 75 to 120 feet higher.   Despite the best efforts of the Trump administration to ignore or contradict scientific reality, carbon dioxide levels continue to soar far outside the bounds of what Homo …

Declining precipitation in Colorado River Basin worsened by rising temperatures

Scientists found that another factor affected the runoff ratio: temperature. Over the last few centuries, the runoff ratio was reduced when temperatures were warmer. And the influence of temperature strengthened during drier years: When the snowpack was shallow, warm temperatures reduced the runoff ratio more than when the snowpack was deep, further exacerbating drought conditions. The low runoff ratios seen …

Ancient carbon in the tundra, an Arctic carbon-freezer, is melting

By Joe Romm, Climate Progress, 15 May 2017 The permafrost, or tundra, has been a very large carbon freezer. For a very long time, it has had a very low decomposition rate for the carbon-rich plant matter. But we’ve been leaving the freezer door wide open and are witnessing the permafrost being transformed from a long-term carbon locker to a …

Paul Hawken and 70-person international team outline the top 100 solutions to climate change (emissions drawdown) based on the data

By David Roberts & Paul Hawken, Vox.com, 10 May 2017 A new book ranks the top 100 solutions to climate change. The results are surprising. A chat with Paul Hawken about his ambitious new effort to “map, measure, and model” global warming solutions. Family planning. Who knew?(Drawdown) By now, the looming dangers of climate change are clear to anyone who’s been …

Warming soils releases more and absorbs less CO2 than previously thought

By James Ayre in Clean Technica, 13 March 2017  As the world’s soils continue warming over the coming decades and centuries, they could release much higher levels of carbon dioxide than was previously thought, according to new research from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is apparently some of the first (or the first) to …

More on how storms, precipitation intensity will increase with temperature

Excerpt, Science Daily, March 2017 The relationship between precipitation and temperature is founded in science. Simply put, warmer air holds more moisture. Scientists can even tell you how much. A widely used theorem in climate science called the Clausius-Clapeyron equation dictates that for every degree the temperature goes up, there is an approximately 7 percent increase in the amount of …

Climate science – it’s a lot older than you think!

The field of climate science stretches back almost 200 years. That’s right: scientists have been studying our planet for that long.  Read down to learn more! One of the biggest myths about climate science – a myth that has been deliberately fostered, for decades — is that we just don’t know that much, yet.  The field is still in its …

The World’s Oceans Are Losing Oxygen. Here’s Why That’s a Big Problem

By Melissa Chan, Originally published in Time Magazine, 17 Feb 2017 Coral reef in Seychelles that is degraded due to global warming.  RainervonBrandis—Getty Images Oceans across the globe are slowly losing oxygen, which poses a major problem for every living marine animal and underscores the serious consequences of climate change, researchers say. A new Nature study published this week found …

New study finds that higher temps in the Southwest since 2000 (1.6 F higher than average) is responsible for 1/6 to half of river flow reductions since 2000

New study found that the higher temperatures in the region since 2000 (1.6° Fahrenheit higher than the average since record-keeping there began) are responsible for between one-sixth to one-half of the river flow reductions seen since 2000.  By James Ayre, cross-posted from Clean Technica, 23 Feb 2017 The warming trend that has accompanied anthropogenic climate change to date has reduced …

Coastal cities could flood three times a week by 2045

By John Updike, 9 Feb 2017, Originally published on Climate Central The lawns of homes purchased this year in vast swaths of coastal America could regularly be underwater before the mortgage has even been paid off, with new research showing high tide flooding could become nearly incessant in places within 30 years. Such floods could occur several times a week …