Warming soils releases more and absorbs less CO2 than previously thought

By James Ayre in Clean Technica, 13 March 2017  As the world’s soils continue warming over the coming decades and centuries, they could release much higher levels of carbon dioxide than was previously thought, according to new research from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is apparently some of the first (or the first) to …

More on how storms, precipitation intensity will increase with temperature

Excerpt, Science Daily, March 2017 The relationship between precipitation and temperature is founded in science. Simply put, warmer air holds more moisture. Scientists can even tell you how much. A widely used theorem in climate science called the Clausius-Clapeyron equation dictates that for every degree the temperature goes up, there is an approximately 7 percent increase in the amount of …

Climate science – it’s a lot older than you think!

The field of climate science stretches back almost 200 years. That’s right: scientists have been studying our planet for that long.  Read down to learn more! One of the biggest myths about climate science – a myth that has been deliberately fostered, for decades — is that we just don’t know that much, yet.  The field is still in its …

The World’s Oceans Are Losing Oxygen. Here’s Why That’s a Big Problem

By Melissa Chan, Originally published in Time Magazine, 17 Feb 2017 Coral reef in Seychelles that is degraded due to global warming.  RainervonBrandis—Getty Images Oceans across the globe are slowly losing oxygen, which poses a major problem for every living marine animal and underscores the serious consequences of climate change, researchers say. A new Nature study published this week found …

New study finds that higher temps in the Southwest since 2000 (1.6 F higher than average) is responsible for 1/6 to half of river flow reductions since 2000

New study found that the higher temperatures in the region since 2000 (1.6° Fahrenheit higher than the average since record-keeping there began) are responsible for between one-sixth to one-half of the river flow reductions seen since 2000.  By James Ayre, cross-posted from Clean Technica, 23 Feb 2017 The warming trend that has accompanied anthropogenic climate change to date has reduced …

Coastal cities could flood three times a week by 2045

By John Updike, 9 Feb 2017, Originally published on Climate Central The lawns of homes purchased this year in vast swaths of coastal America could regularly be underwater before the mortgage has even been paid off, with new research showing high tide flooding could become nearly incessant in places within 30 years. Such floods could occur several times a week …

Social costs of carbon need to be updated, say the National Academy of Sciences

Washington Post, 14 January 2017. How we view the costs of future climate change, and more importantly how we quantify them, may soon be changing. A much-anticipated new report, just released by the National Academy of Sciences, recommends major updates to a federal metric known as the “social cost of carbon” —  and its suggestions could help address a growing …

Abrupt sea level rise (SLR) looms as an increasing threat

99% of Earth’s freshwater ice is locked up in the Antarctic and Greenland ice caps. Now, a growing number of studies are raising the possibility that as those ice sheets melt, sea levels could rise by six feet this century, and far higher in the next, flooding many of the world’s populated coastal areas. 5 May 2016 from Yale 360 by Nicola …