The National Climate Assessment shows rising global temperatures are having ripple effects across the environment our economy was built on

7 Nov 2017, by Sabrina Shankman, Inside Climate News For decades, the world has been told that the climate is changing—that the build-up of fossil fuel-driven greenhouse gas emissions would irrevocably change the Earth’s systems. Those changes are already happening across the United States, the newest volume of the National Climate Assessment says. The exhaustive report, written by scientists and released Friday by 13 federal …

Latest on the strongest evidence of climate change

On an article by Kevin Trenberth in Inside Climate News – must see graphics Kevin Trenberth is the head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and co-author of a new paper on ocean warming.  The rate at which the oceans are heating up has nearly doubled since 1992, and that heat is reaching ever deeper waters, according to a …

Denial and delayed shift matter as oil majors opt for profits and accrue responsibility: Top 90 carbon producers account for 43% of emissions rise from 1980-2010. Combustion from the top 20 is 19.6%

Researchers have quantified the contributions of industrialized and developing nations’ historical emissions to global surface temperature rise. Recent findings that nearly two-thirds of total industrial CO2 and CH4 emissions can be traced to 90 major industrial carbon producers have drawn attention to their potential climate responsibilities. Here, we use a simple climate model to quantify the contribution of historical (1880–2010) and recent …

We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2 C this century and avoid catastrophic and existential crises, warn experts

We must move faster towards a low-carbon world if we are to limit global warming to 2 C this century, experts warn. Changes in electricity, heat, buildings, industry and transport are needed rapidly and must happen all together, according to researchers at the universities of Sussex, Manchester and Oxford in a new study published in the journal Science. To provide a …

It takes just 4 years to detect human-induced ocean warming

Excerpt from the Guardian.com, Sept 2017 Global ocean heat content data isn’t as noisy as land-based and surface temperatures.  It represents the total thermal energy in the ocean waters, and is now known with a high degree of certainty (see the figure below), in part because scientists have improved ocean temperature sensing methods and increased the number of sensors throughout …

Loss of periglacial zones is in progress

The decline of cold regions called periglacial zones is now inevitable due to climate change, researchers say.  Periglacial zones, where there is often a layer of frozen ground known as permafrost, make up about a quarter of Earth’s land surface and are mostly found in the far north and south, and at high altitudes. Scientists from the universities of Exeter …

Mechanism for rapid warming in northern hemisphere and Arctic temperatures uncovered

Ancient tree reveals cause of spike in Arctic temperature: 30,000 year old kauri tree reveals atmospheric mechanism that led to Dansgaard-Oeschger event during last glacial period, 12 Sep 2017 by the University of New South Wales A kauri tree preserved in a New Zealand peat swamp for 30,000 years has revealed a new mechanism that may explain how temperatures in the …

Study of contrarian papers: rife with methodological errors and no cohesive, consistent alternative theory to human-caused global warming

 Galileo demonstrating his astronomical theories. Climate contrarians have virtually nothing in common with Galileo. Photograph: Tarker/Tarker/Corbis By Dana Nuccitelli, 22 Feb 2017, The Guardian Those who reject the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming often invoke Galileo as an example of when the scientific minority overturned the majority view. In reality, climate contrarians have almost nothing in common with Galileo, whose conclusions were based on …

Utilities Knew: Power Providers Had Info/Acknowledged Impacts of Climate Change 50 Years Ago

8/3/2017 – BY ENERGY AND POLICY INSTITUTE Scientists had begun to warn electric utilities about climate change by 1968, and by 1988 the industry’s official research and development organization had acknowledged that, “There is growing consensus in the scientific community that the greenhouse effect is real.” Despite this early knowledge about climate change, electric utilities have continued to invest heavily in …