Shifting toward renewables and not looking back: First/original nations plan for future resilience

Excerpt from Alaska’s Small Village Turn Toward Renewables and Don’t Look Back, Yes! Magazine, fall 2017 Just Transition issue People here focus on more immediate, practical issues—but that’s why renewable energy is winning. It makes economic sense. The microgrid technology has been proven, and costs are coming down.  One important lesson for the Lower 48 is the need for political …

Safe, Strong, and Just Rebuilding After Disasters: Every $1 invested in upgrades repays $4

Build back better. Rebuild infrastructure to higher standards, and support innovative solutions that can better withstand extreme weather and other risks. Update flood risk data—and use it. Flood maps should be updated and planning commence for these areas and alternatives. Prioritize communities that have the fewest resources to rebuild. Extreme weather events hit hardest in areas struggling to make ends meet and in …

Storms bringing extra rain with climate change and breakdown of polar vortex can lead to temperature lows

This year’s intense Atlantic storm season had another element tying its biggest events together: a monstrous, and sometimes deadly, amount of rain. Images of the flooded metropolises of Houston, Jacksonville, and San Juan with overtopped dams, billowing sewage, and flooded homes show that torrential rain can be one of the most devastating consequences of hurricanes, especially in urban areas where concrete makes …

Harvey Wrecks up to a Million Cars in Houston and 15% Lack Car Insurance. METRO is is working with state and federal relief agencies to distribute schedules and loaded Q cards to those in shelters and other government-paid housing.

What are some of the ways to adapt transportation for the future, in the wake of disasters and flooding like Hurricane Harvey? Of the 85% of Texas vehicle owners with insurance coverage, just three-quarters have comprehensive insurance policies that are sure to cover flood damage. Even if just 300,000 were destroyed, a lowball estimate —that’s 100,000 people who may have to …

Increasing droughts, lower crop yields (just 40% already in Utah and forecast to go to 10%), and increased stress and conflict

A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change’s impact on irrigation. The most adversely affected region, according to the researchers, will be the Southwest. Already a water-stressed part of the country, this region is projected to experience …

Asian typhoons becoming more intense, have grown 50% stronger in the past 40 years due to warming seas

By Damian Carrington in The Guardian, 2016  On 7 July 2015, satellite images showed the Pacific Ocean with two typhoons, one tropical storm, one formation alert and one large area of increased convection. Photograph: JMA MTSAT-2/NOAA The destructive power of the typhoons that wreak havoc across China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines has intensified by 50% in the past 40 years due …

Heat risks are nearly unthinkable, as global warming remains major culprit behind extreme weather

Source: Xinhua| 2017-07-18 Editor: Song Lifang GENEVA, July 18 (Xinhua) — Global warming remains the main reason for recent extreme weather conditions worldwide, including the long-lasting heat waves and scorching temperatures across the northern hemisphere, according to a latest study of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Using the climate assessment models of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the WMO predicted …