Water stress due to climate change threatens thermoelectric power stations, which use large amounts of freshwater for cooling. Solution is to go renewable

By Joshua Hill in Clean Technica, 27 July 2017  Increasing water stress caused by a global climate change will have far-ranging consequences, and according to a new study, water scarcity and warmth could begin impacting European electricity generation as soon as 2030, possibly decreasing production or ceasing production altogether. Coal power plant with direct cooling | Image Credit: iStockphoto ©Michael …

Energy as a common good

Mayors across the country have vowed to deliver on the goals of the Paris climate accord in defiance of President Trump’s decision to back out. But how can they, realistically, when the national government is questioning climate science and promoting coal, fracking, and pipelines? “When a local economy is dominated by enterprises that work to extract value for Wall Street …

Deadly Heat Waves Could Endanger 74% of Mankind by 2100, Study Says: A new online tool explores the number of days per year in places worldwide when heat is likely to exceed a deadly threshold if nothing is done about climate change.

An increasing percentage of the planet faces deadly heat for 20 or more days per year, with one-third of the world’s population currently at risk. Credit: Chris Hondros/Getty Images Inside Climate News, June 2017 Deadly heat waves—already a risk for 30 percent of the world’s population—will spread around the globe, posing a danger for 74 percent of people on Earth …

Hawaii electricity at 26% renewables on way to 48% by 2020, 67% by 2030. Germany is at 35% in first half of 2017

By Andrea Bertoli, Clean Technica, 28 June 2017 At the GreenBiz Verge Honolulu last week (formally the Asia Pacific Clean Energy Summit), I had the opportunity to connect with the renewables and sustainability community from across the state (and beyond). The event ‘welcomes those seeking to seize the renewable energy opportunity’ and the diverse crowd included government, military, local businesses, international companies, …

Democracy, the energy transition, and the America we want

What does this day — intended as a celebration of democracy, our republic, and the founding ideals of the United States — mean when the Trump administration is expanding and entrenching corporate power in ways that are antithetical to our democracy? How do we most effectively transform our society to end economic injustice and inequity, systemic racism and oppression to …

South Australia , already at 57% wind and solar in 2016/17, meets 2025 goal of 50% over 9 years early

By Giles Parkinson on Renew Economy, 6 June 2017 The South Australian government’s official target for renewable energy is 50 per cent of local demand by 2025. According to the Australian Energy Regulator, it didn’t just reach that target in 2016/17, eight years early, it is literally blowing past it. Data released in the AER’s state of the energy market report released last …

Texas is too windy and sunny for old energy companies to make money

By Ryan Collins, Bloomberg, 20 June 2017 As attractive a renewable-energy concept as wind power is, it’s plagued by a fundamental flaw. It blows the most in the dead of night, precisely when there’s the least demand for electricity. That’s true for just about every wind-blown spot across the U.S., from the foothills of the Tehachapi Mountains in California to the coastal …

Ways cities are implementing clean energy

City rules Relatively easy places to start Adopt a resolution to get your community to 100% renewable energy by 2050 (or sooner). Sample ordinance: Pueblo, CO; Traverse City, MI; East Hampton, NY Minimize zoning and permitting costs for renewable energy systems. Sample ordinance: Lancaster, CA Replace all public lighting with LEDs.  Sample ordinance: New York, NY.  Examples: Oahu, Sioux Falls, New York …

Harnessing energy from glass walls: Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells have been developed that could be great candidates for solar windows

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Science Daily, 29 May 2017  A Korean research team has developed semi-transparent perovskite solar cells that could be great candidates for solar windows. Scientists are exploring ways to develop transparent or semi-transparent solar cells as a substitute for glass walls in modern buildings with the aim of harnessing solar energy. But this has …