Boulder Voters Say (Again): “We’ll Lead Movement to Energy Democracy”

By John Farrell, Nov 21, 2017, on ILSR It was a squeaker. With 85% of votes cast, the outlook for Boulder’s quest to control its energy future seemed dimmer than it had since 2011. The nays were up by 100 votes, in favor of ending funding for the city’s effort to take over its electric utility and bolster locally-produced renewable energy. A late night …

Highlights from Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy by Michael Hudson

Last annotated on May 15, 2017 The “Forgash Plan,” named for Florida Senator Morris Forgash, proposed a World Bank for Economic Acceleration with an alternative policy to the existing World Bank – lending in domestic currency for land reform and greater self-sufficiency in food instead of plantation export crops. My first evening’s visit with him transfixed me with two ideas …

Happiness Is Other People

By Ruth Whippman, 27 Oct 2017 In a particularly low moment a few years back, after arriving friendless and lonely from Britain to live in the United States, I downloaded a “happiness app” onto my phone. It was surprisingly hard to choose one. There were close to a thousand bliss-promising options in the app store — ones that would teach …

18 Nov 2017 in Clean Technica by Zachary Shahan  The #1 complaint about Tesla seems to be that … we have to wait too long for mass production of its products. That’s sort of a sign that the company is doing things quite well. Actually, if you crunch the numbers, you can see that Tesla cars offer more range, better performance, better …

He draws comparisons with two other great, slow-moving, but ultimately successful legal and public opinion battles: against segregation, where the innate conservatism of judges was overcome by the civil rights movement, and tobacco, where the courts accepted the science despite a misinformation campaign by the industry.

Jim Hansen says litigation and political mobilisation are more effective than protests. “Those are defence. We should be on the offensive. The lawsuits versus Trump and the fossil fuel industry are offence. People should use the democratic process,” he says. “That’s our best chance. It’s better than getting arrested.” He draws comparisons with two other great, slow-moving, but ultimately successful …

Our paper shows that during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, coastal wetlands prevented more than US$625 million in direct property damages by buffering coasts against its storm surge. Across 12 coastal states, from Maine to North Carolina, wetlands and marshes reduced damages by an average of 11 percent. These benefits varied widely by location at the local and state level. In Maryland, …

For Oil Industry, Clean Air Fight Was Dress Rehearsal for Climate Denial: Through the Smoke and Fumes Committee, industry blurred the science surrounding air pollution and worked to forestall unwanted regulation

By Neela Banerjee (former Moscow correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, for Inside Climate News, 6 May 2016 Caltech scientist Arie Haagen-Smit (pictured) discovered in the early 1950s that oil was the cause of the dangerous smog shrouding L.A. Industry then conducted its own research to discredit Haagen-Smit’s findings and manufacture doubt around the link between oil and smog. It …

Americans who think global warming is happening outnumber those who think it is not by more than 5 to 1

Nov 16, 2017, Climate Change in the American Mind: October 2017, by Anthony Leiserowitz, Edward Maibach, Connie Roser-Renouf, Seth Rosenthal, Matthew Cutler and John Kotcher. Filed under: Beliefs & Attitudes Executive Summary This report from the Yale Program on Climate and Communication documents an upward trend in Americans’ concern about global warming, as reflected in several key indicators tracked since 2008, including substantial increases in Americans’ certainty that global warming …

Dockless accelerates bikeshare into a higher gear

Politico, 16 Nov 2017 It was the nation’s first bikeshare program when it started in 2010, a mere seven years ago. Since then, the Washington, D.C. area’s Capital Bikeshare has become one of the country’s largest and most successful, spanning five jurisdictions that reach across the Potomac River into Virginia, with more geographic expansion set for 2018. Membership has climbed …