Thermoelectric energy at high risk of blackouts with droughts: Water shortages cost India enough energy to power Sri Lanka

By  Tianyi Luo – WRI  July 26, 2017   A power plant in India. Flickr/Vikramdeep Singh India is making great strides to aggressively expand its renewable energy capacity. But the country’s power sector remains highly reliant on thermoelectric plants, with high demand for water for cooling. That means that droughts, like the one caused last year by weak monsoons, can shut off the power, hampering …

Academia and the Transition to an Ecological Civilization (University of Alberta) Home/Ecological Civilization/Academia and the Transition to an Ecological Civilization (University of Alberta) By David C. Korten This presentation was delivered on January 30, 2017, at the 20th annual International Week, hosted by the Global Education Program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. A printable PDF version is available HERE.  I’m thrilled to …

10 Provocations for the Next 10 years of Social Innovation

By Indy Johar Co-founder Project 00, Senior Innovation Associate Young Foundation, Demos Associate, Fellow Respublica, 13 July 2017 The last ten years have been an important, formative period for the revival of social innovation, we have seen a new generation of actors contribute to the renewal of our societal goods. The work of the Young Foundation, Nesta, McConnell foundation, MaRS, Big Society …

A New Zealand River Has Human Rights. Now Will Modern Law Come to Its Senses?  Humanity is slowly reawakening to the simple logic that Mother Earth’s rights must come before human rights

David Korten posted Jul 07, 2017 It was a stunning breakthrough in a rights issue that could be a crucial step toward ensuring a human future. In March, New Zealand passed theTe Awa Tupua Bill making New Zealand’s Whanganui River the first river in the world to hold the same legal rights, responsibilities, and liabilities as a human person. For the Maori people, it …

The Costs of Monopoly: Contrary to conventional wisdom, monopolies inflict substantial economic harm, particularly on the poor 

JAMES A. SCHMITZ, JR. | Senior Research Economist,   https://www.minneapolisfed.org/publications/the-region/the-costs-of-monopoly-a-new-view Economists overwhelmingly agree that the actual costs of monopoly are small, even trivial. This consensus is based on a theory that assumes monopolies are well-run businesses that limit their output in order to drive up prices and maximize profit. And because empirical studies have found that monopolists do not restrict …

Inequality link to climate change

Income is may explain 30 percent of the total household carbon emissions in Europe (likely more in the US where inequality is higher).  Rising incomes are expected to increase greenhouse gas emissions because people will have greater purchasing power. “It makes sense that the richer you are, the greater your purchasing power and the environmental impacts associated with it,” she …

Allowable ‘carbon budget’ most likely overestimated

While most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define “pre-industrial” to be in the late 1800’s, a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past, according to an international team of researchers who are concerned because it affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warming limit agreed …

Second largest public bus system in the country (Los Angeles) shifting to 100% clean, electric buses

CommonDreams.org, 28 July 2017 China mandated the integration of electric buses in late 2015, and now leads the world with more than 100,000 electric buses on its roads. European cities such as London are already in the process of similar transitions, and many more are making plans. Eurotransport Magazine reported in January that at least 19 public transport authorities in 25 European cities have developed electric bus plans for …